02:56 GMT30 October 2020
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    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - Hispanic Americans have been dying from COVID-19 at three times the national average as a consequence of President Donald Trump's pandemic policy, while his actions on Cuba have left the government there stronger and more repressive, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said in a speech in Miami.

    "The infection rate among Hispanics is almost three times higher [than the national average]. More than 40,000 Hispanics have died from COVID-19," Biden said in his speech on Monday.

    Biden was speaking in the Little Havana district of Miami, Florida, a region that saw its Cuban-American community overwhelmingly support Trump when he narrowly won the state in the 2016 presidential election.

    Biden also slammed the president's policies on Cuba saying they had failed for four years.

    "The administration's policy is not working. There are more political prisoners [in Cuba] than there were four years ago. Russia is an increasing presence in Miami. It is unconscionable to send Cubans back to Cuba. Almost 10,000 Cuban refugees are languishing on the Mexican border because the administration is not processing visas," Biden noted.

    Florida, with 29 Electoral College votes, is one of the four most populous states in the United States, and a must-win for the Trump campaign in its plans for the 3 November election.

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    Tags:
    Donald Trump, coronavirus, COVID-19, hispanic americans, Miami, Florida, Joe Biden, US Election 2020, United States
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