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    More Than Half of Muslim Refugees Hold Anti-Semitic Views, Study Claims

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    Over 50 percent of asylum-seekers polled in the German state of Bavaria revealed anti-Semitic views.

    A new study by the Hanns Seidel Foundation, a think tank closely allied with the Christian Social Union political party, revealed that refugees polled in 2016 have consistently anti-Semitic beliefs.

    The poll, conducted throughout 2016 in the Bavarian cities of Nuremberg and Pliening, interviewed almost 800 asylum-seekers from countries including Syria, Eritrea, Iraq and Afghanistan, according to the Jerusalem Post.

    "More than half of Muslim asylum seekers showed clear tendencies of an anti —Semitic attitude pattern," wrote the authors of the study.

    In the course of the study participants were asked to judge the statement: "Jews have too much influence in the world," and 52 percent of Syrians and 53 percent of Iraqis in the poll agreed. Almost 60 percent of Afghans participating in the poll agreed with the same statement. Those participants hailing from predominantly Christian Eritrea, however, reflected a different stance, with just 5.4 percent of those respondents judged to hold an anti-Semitic view.

    The 201-page Seidel report asserted that "the decisive factor that explains anti-Semitic opinions is one's religious group."

    The study report also noted that "emotional prejudices against Israeli families" were prevalent in the participants' belief systems.

    According to the Jerusalem Post, German intelligence — reporting in 2015 on the exploding refugee and migrant population in the country — wrote that, "We are importing Islamic extremism, Arab anti-Semitism, national and ethnic conflicts of other peoples as well as a different societal and legal understanding."

    The Berlin intelligence report added that "German security agencies" would not be able to "solve these imported security problems" which, according to the report, explained "arising reactions from the German population," cited by Jpost.com.

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    asylum, report, anti-Semitism, study, refugees, asylum, poll, refugees, Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union (CDU/CSU), Nuremberg, Afghanistan, Germany, Syria, Iraq, Bavaria, Eritrea
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