9 February 2014, 01:52

Western envy of Russia and Slavs boundless – John Shipton

Western envy of Russia and Slavs boundless – John Shipton
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Through all of his work with WikiLeaks Julian Assange has been instrumental in bringing about a revolution in the way that people perceive the world and has made it possible to see actuality better than was previously possible. After over three years in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London Mr. Assange may be showing the wear of his confinement although he is well and welcoming to his guests. In an interview with the Voice of Russia John Shipton spoke about the conditions of Mr. Assange’s confined life and despite the admirable treatment of Mr. Assange by the Ecuadorians, revealed that Mr. Assange has not been outside for over three years and is forced to use special lamps and take vitamin D because of a lack of elementary sunshine. With regard to Russia and the asylum granted to Edward Snowden, Mr. Shipton praised the Russian authorities and President Putin and said the envy of Russia and the Slavic civilization by the West may be behind their continued anti-Russian stance.

PART I

PART II

This is John Robles, you are listening to an interview with John Shipton, the Chief Executive Officer of the Wikileaks Party in Australia. This is part three of a longer interview. You can find the rest of this interview on our website at voiceofrussia.com. This interview is in progress.

Robles: Speaking about politicians now. These recordings that you said came out, were they used to try to smear you or demonize you; were they used by politicians, or by the security services, or why do you think they were released, and can you talk about those?

Shipton:Well they were just excerpts from conversations, and they were just to smear, yes, of course, yes, yes, whipped together by, I don’t know, somebody who doesn’t like me. And I don’t know how they got hold of the conversations but there they were

Robles: Did they try to prosecute you or anything, with those recordings, or with words taken out of the context?

Shipton:No, no. Just the only thing that happened was that they were put up on the Net, and recomposed - the wording recomposed - to make it appear that I was saying, you know saying… sentences taken out of context, to make it appear that I was doing something that I wasn’t doing.

Robles: I see. I’ve had that problem myself, actually, one phrase taken out of context, a famous incident where I said a certain person’s days were numbered in Russia, if the person continued behaving that way. And they took out ‘days were numbered’ as if I was threatening his life or something. They are very good at that.

Shipton:Yes, it can be quite dangerous, that sort of thing.

Robles: Yeah, and they are quite good at it.

Shipton:Yeah, I’d just like to say inclosing, that Julian has brought about a revolution in the perception of the world and brought the capacity to see actuality closer than we ever had before.

And I’d like to thank you John. The reason why I asked your name is because I had heard your voice so much, and read your name. When you told me your name I realized I had read it, so I am a fan for a few years. So congratulations and keep up the good work.

Robles: You are a fan of mine. Wow, thank you, sir. I’m a fan of yours and of Julian’s and WikiLeaks and all of you guys. I usually ask people that might have contact with Julian – how is he? Because I saw him, he gave an interview, he was commenting on Obama’s empty NSA speech and he looked a little worse for wear with the beard and everything. How is Julian?

Shipton: It must be getting quite wearing. I saw Julian at Christmas time, and he was well and welcoming and warm. We are going over in April, so I can let you know after April.

Robles: That would be great. I’m very honored that you heard my voice before. Listen, one more thing, and I think this is very important and people are not focusing on it and I think they deserve a huge round of applause, maybe a standing ovation. I’m referring to the authorities of the small country of Ecuador – who, they in their little embassy in London are single-handedly making a stand against the empire. What can you say about Ecuadorian authorities? Would you like to say anything to them?

Shipton:The Ecuadorians are people who have enormous courage and their treatment of Julian is just admirable. And their treatment of Julian is just admirable, and their treatment of me when I go there is welcoming and warm. I can’t imagine a finer group of people, they are just, you know, they’re very, very strong and warm and intelligent people.

Robles: Wow. What would you say about the Russian authorities and their asylum for Edward Snowden. Were you surprised by that?

Shipton:No, I admire President Putin’s colorful turn of phrase when the matter came up. And I also think he is probably correct: ‘It is like shaving a pig, in there’s not much hair and a lot of noise’.

So, and I think that the Russians acted well, and I think gathered support from ordinary people all around the world for their actions, which of course the United States and the United Kingdom are doing their best to undo this admiration with publications like Luke Harding’s book which goes to say idiotic statements like: ‘a captive of the FSB’. I mean it’s just absurd, what he’s a captive of is his native country’s determination to lock him up.

Robles: Right, right. He would have never been here if it wasn’t for the US revoking his passport when he was in Sheremetyevo airport. And the statement you said about, the quote by President Putin – ‘it was like shaving a pig’, was right on, because Edward Snowden was never Russia’s agent. He didn’t come here to provide the Russian intelligence services with all of the NSA’s secrets. So really, I mean, Russia didn’t ask for him to come here.

So, Edward Snowden,he had no relationship with Russia, he is obviously an American patriot and he would like to return there. So I was quite proud of the Russian government for taking that kind of a stance on an issue such as this.

Shipton:Me too, me too. Particularly as the envy of Russia and the Slavic civilization by the west seems to be boundless at the present time though. I did admire, I think it was Schröder, who was the Chancellor of Germany, and his closeness to Russia in building the pipeline from the north. I thought that would bring in integrationofRussia and the European economy which would bring further development of peaceful congress.

Robles: Well, and stability and better conditions for all of Europe and the people I think. Anyway if you’d like to finish up – here is your chance for the big knock-out punch if you would?

Shipton:No, I would. My hope is that, my daily hope is that Julian will be out of the embassy pretty soon and able to move around freely, that’s my only concern. That’s what we work for: the just treatment of Julian Assange- he can move about freely in the world.

Robles: Yes. Can I ask you a question now? Maybe this is a stupid question but I haven’t heard anything in any reports or seen anything but, maybe it is a silly question, but is Julian … can he go outside anywhere? Is there like an internal courtyard in the embassy or something where he can at least see the sunshine sometimes?

Shipton:No.

Robles: No?

Shipton:No. The sunshine is artificial. That’s a, a UV-light and an infrared light, and a vitamin D tablet.

Robles: So he hasn’t even been outside for over three years?

Shipton:No, since being at the embassy, he hasn’t been outside.

Robles: Oh my god, that is worse than being in prison.

Shipton:Very, very similarly except the Ecuadorians do everything they can to make the suffering bearable.

Robles: I see. Well thank God for the Ecuadorians I guess, right. OK. Ok Sir, thank you Sir, it was an honor really, thank you very much. I appreciate it.

Shipton:Dosvidanya.

Robles: Dosvidanya. Bye bye.

You were listening to an interview with John Shipton, the Chief Executive Officer of the Wikileaks Party in Australia. That is part three of a longer interview. You can find the rest of this interview on our website at voiceofrussia.com. Thank you very much for listening and as always I wish you the best wherever in the world you may be.

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