15:55 GMT +326 March 2017
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    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watches the rocket launch (File)

    China to Trump: North Korean Nuclear Program is Your Problem

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    On Friday China dismissed pressure from US President Donald Trump to reconsider its relationship with North Korea, suggesting that Washington must hash out its own issues with Pyongyang.

    In a Thursday interview, Trump expressed concern over North Korea’s continued development of ballistic missiles and the militarization of Beijing’s territories in the South China Sea. "I know exactly what's going on between China and North Korea and everybody else," he said, "I'm not liking it." 

    Claiming that Beijing could intervene in North Korea, "very easily if they want to," Trump said he wants China to influence Pyongyang, to rein in its military activities, especially those involving nuclear weapons. 

    Beijing has publicly called for Pyongyang’s denuclearization in the past, and has urged the increasingly isolated nation to return to the bargaining table, to ensure global security.

    Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang responded to Trump, telling a news briefing, "We have said many times already that the crux of the North Korean nuclear issue is the problem between the United States and North Korea…We hope the relevant parties can shoulder their responsibilities, play the role the should, and together with China play a constructive role for peace and stability on the Korean peninsula and for its denuclearization." 

    Geng also told Xinhua that the US overestimates China’s influence over North Korea. "The Trump White House needs to make the first move and talk to Pyongyang. The United States stands to lose nothing for trying this," he said.

    Following another North Korean ballistic missile test, Beijing announced last week that would ban coal imports from Pyongyang. The Chinese Commerce Ministry said this was done in accordance with a UN resolution agreeing to levy sanctions against Pyongyang after the country detonated five nuclear weapons in 2016. 

    After the fifth detonation in September 2016, Hua Chunying, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman, noted, "The core of the issue is the conflict between the [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea] and the US. It is the US who should reflect upon how the situation has become what it is today and search for a better solution. It is better for the doer to undo what he has done. The U.S. should shoulder its due responsibilities."

    Pyongyang fired back after the announcement of the ban by Beijing, with the Korean Central News Agency accusing China of "dancing to the tune of the US while defending its mean behavior with such excuses that it was meant not to have a negative impact on the living of the people in the DPRK but to check its nuclear program."

    Despite these developments Geng maintains that relations between the two Asian countries are still intact. "We are willing to work with North Korea to promote the stable and healthy development of relations," he said.

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    Tags:
    Sanctions, Nuclear Weapons, ballistic missile launches, denuclearization, Kim Jong-un, Donald Trump, United States, Democratic Republic of North Korea (DPRK), China
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    • siberianhusky
      Well said China.
      America don't drop your problems for world domination on China's shoulders
    • avatar
      armor
      With Mr. Trump in charge, the Us of NA should take the initiative, show some humility, a cardinal virtue, and approach N.K. directly for talks. They would come out stronger, if strength is what they seek...Do it Mr Trump, surprise us all.
    • avatar
      newdays
      China is right on this one - NK is not their wayward two year old. Nor is the US. US needs to trump-up and make amends so there can be positive movement.
    • avatar
      Randall Lee Hilburnin reply tosiberianhusky(Show commentHide comment)
      siberianhusky, The problem is the US plan to do a regime change in North Korea. They were trying to do that even before NK started their nuclear weapons program. If they would renounce their plot, maybe NK would have a reason to scale back their program. Otherwise they would be fools to do so.
    • avatar
      hopscotch64
      Again China shows it's hypocrisy. As long as China supports and implements sanctions (an act of war) and plots against the DPRK, why would the US initiate talks with the DPRK. China is doing the US dirty work for them. The only way the US will come to the table without preconditions is kicking and screaming as a last resort. This would mean China must reverse course and dash the hopes of the US that China will overthrow the DPRK government, leaving no alternative except war or diplomacy. War is not an option, the cost in human and economic terms would be self defeating for both sides and leaves only diplomacy as a viable option.
    • horseguards
      What, don't fancy another go at North Korea, President Trump? Ha, ha, ha.
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply toarmor(Show commentHide comment)
      armor, are you kidding? You cannot deal with dictators and any good diplomat would tell you that.
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply tonewdays(Show commentHide comment)
      newdays, really? Have you any idea what N.K. does to get China's attention and to which China has always responded?
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply toRandall Lee Hilburn(Show commentHide comment)
      Randall Lee Hilburn, N.K. is a rogue state and answers to no one nor does it obey international law if it doesn't suit them. We had an incident off our east coast some years back involving a N.K. freighter that had dropped off a massive quantity of illicit manufactured drugs. The feds were not able to stop the ship from leaving port so had to enlist the help of the navy, a frigate if I remember correctly, that soon intercepted that vessel making its way back to N.K. and whose captain refused to stand to for boarding purposes.

      And this was in Australian territorial waters - so a warning shot was fired across the N.K. freighter's bow to which it did stop. Personally, I would have put several shots into the wheel house!

      To my knowledge the captain and his crew are still serving time in one of our jails and that freighter was broken up for scrap. The Kim regime produce and sell drugs internationally and you would uphold their autonomy?
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply tohopscotch64(Show commentHide comment)
      hopscotch64, N.K.. is used by China as a buffer against invasion. N.K. knows this and has used its own people against China by first starving them and then sending them en-mass over the border into China - whenever N.K. has done that China soon retreats.

      China has many internal problems that are not readily advertized, particularly with their Muslim population, so they don't need millions of North Koreans fleeing into China and adding to the mix.

      So, this is really China's problem, not the U.S.
    • avatar
      LaMoy
      North Korea is depicted across Western media as a backward nation run by a despotic, delusional leader encircled by advisers suffering from irrational, militant paranoia. It is also depicted as a prominent security threat in Asia-Pacific. In fact, North Korea's behavior is provoked by the hostility of the forces of US-South Korea-Japan axis. Its missile and nuclear weapon programs are not as "irrational" or "provocative" as Western media attempts to portray. It is an attempt to deter conflict, not provoke it. North Korea does not possess the means to overrun American-South Korean-Japanese forces or menace its neighbors in Asia-Pacific significantly. Doing so would be greatly destabilizing to its closest allies in China and detrimental to its own self-preservation. Its missiles and nuclear weapons are not the the actions of a deranged leadership seeking conflict, but a very rational strategy of deterrence designed to time-out the clock as the sun sets on US Asian-Pacific hegemony. North Korea is America's problem, not China's.
    • avatar
      newdaysin reply toterryjohnodgers(Show commentHide comment)
      terryjohnodgers, good point that does not address what I said.
      China is not the overseer, overlord nor owner of North Korea. It is not their job to clean up nor to make accord between the US and NK.

      US needs to grow up and acknowledge the messes they have made and the enemies their arrogance created. It is not the place of the US to demand another nation to do so.
      I like the Chinese push for six party talks. Under Trump the US can be a dialoguing member.

      China and NK have a working relationship - as with many of us a not so nice neighbor is worked with or around and not yelled at. And when that neighbor causes a ruckus with someone down the street, it is not our job to fix it.
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply tonewdays(Show commentHide comment)
      newdays, You make the mistake of believing that the Chinese Communist government thinks and behaves like all Western countries. You need to remember what happened at Tianamen Square back in 1986? and how the Chinese authorities responded to university students who staged a demonstration calling for democracy to appreciate how brutal a communist regime can be to its own people.

      China has financially and materially propped up the North Koreans for decades because of -A. It is a buffer zone to invasion and B. as I mentioned previously they have their own internal problems and do not wish to have to deal with millions of North Koreans flooding their country. Therefore and no matter how you would wish it otherwise, North Korea is really a Chinese problem.

      You need to also reassess just which country is the belligerent aggressor here, and for all its previous underhandedness throughout the world, it is not the United States this time.

      You need to also ask yourself why China has been elevated by the Globalists into an aggressive world power that has been rattling the sabre, annexing Islands for strategic purposes and now threatens war with the United States and any other country that stands in its way.

      Those actions alone should tell you that China is no one's friend and will do whatever it takes to suit China. Even the Russians know that.
    • avatar
      newdaysin reply toterryjohnodgers(Show commentHide comment)
      terryjohnodgers, according to your view I am mistaken. According to mine I am not. I am using a different perspective. We are speaking apples and oranges -- or pandas and eagles.
      I do not call your point of view wrong. Can you extend the same courtesy?
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply tonewdays(Show commentHide comment)
      newdays, as I have already pointed out to you, it is your mistake to believe that China will act according to how you think. If you can believe that to be a kind of discourtesy to you then I would suggest that you are easily offended as there was no intention on my part to be discourteous.

      And I will also state here as further to my comment above. Your view of how China works is naïve and precludes you from seeing the bigger picture which is one of China being THE dominant economy to the Western world.

      Trump knows this and that is why he is taking the fight to the communist Chinese government, one of the most brutal governments to its own people of today.
    • avatar
      K.T
      Every one new that china supplied nuclear weopons to both N.Korea n Pakistan illigaly. So thats why its not china problem..
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