06:02 GMT +316 December 2018
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    Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson delivers a speech at the Policy Exchange in London, Wednesday Feb. 14, 2018.

    Boris Johnson Paid Over $120k By US Asset Management Firm for Two-Hour Speech

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    The exorbitant payment was made to the former UK foreign secretary for giving a two-hour speech, equating to an hourly rate of around $60,000.

    Boris Johnson, the former foreign secretary and London mayor, was paid £94,507 (over $120,000 at the current GBP/USD exchange rate) by a top US asset management firm for a “speaking engagement” in November, it has transpired.

    As detailed in the parliament’s register of MPs’ financial interests, Johnson was paid the hefty sum by GoldenTree Asset Management for two hours’ worth of work, in addition to having his travel and accommodation expenses covered.

    READ MORE: Jet-Set to Jeddah: BoJo Condemns Saudis Who Paid £14,000 for His Visit

    Johnson is paid around £77,000 (circa $100,000) per year for his MP duties, and he is also employed by the Daily Telegraph as a columnist, receiving almost £280,000 (around $360,000) for just over 100 hours of work per annum.

    After resigning from his cabinet position earlier this year, following the Chequers Summit, Johnson has vocally criticized UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit strategy, and has been tipped as a successor to the PM.

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    Tags:
    expenses, speech, Brexit, GoldenTree Asset Management, UK Government, Conservative Party, Boris Johnson, Theresa May, United States, United Kingdom
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