19:45 GMT06 August 2020
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    New Delhi (Sputnik): The death of African- American George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis has led to international protests against police brutality and racism with the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement taking centre stage.

    Delhi Police has beefed up security at all US government buildings in the city, including the Embassy, amid fears of ‘Black Lives Matter’ protests breaking out.

    According to a senior police officer, the move is in response to tip-offs from a special unit which has intelligence that protests outside the US Embassy are likely to take place with similar scenes of violence to those seen in Europe and throughout the United States.

    “The inputs pointed that the protesters can line up at US establishments like the Embassy, Centres or schools. Considering that the protest in other countries turned violent, we have increased the security around all these across the city,” the officer said.

    Currently, protests, rallies and gatherings of any kind are not allowed in India in accordance with government guidelines amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    “We will make sure that the government’s guidelines are not violated and with no permission granted for any protest, immediate action is in line for the violators,” the officer said.

    ‘Black Lives Matter’ protests have taken place worldwide following the death of African American George Floyd who died in police custody in Minneapolis after a police officer knelt on his neck for more than eight minutes.  

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    Tags:
    security, violence, Racism, Protest, United States, United States, African American, US Embassy, India, New Delhi
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