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    Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, 2nd right, chats with British entrepeneur Brent Hoberman, left, anti-cyber bullying campaigner James Okulaja, 2nd left, and President of EMEA Business and Operations for Google, Matt Brittin during his visit to launch the national action plan to tackle cyberbullying at the London headquarters of Google and YouTube in King's Cross, London, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017.

    Tax Burden: UK Poised to Prod Web Companies to Help Fight Terrorism – Minister

    © AP Photo / Tolga Akmen
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    The UK Minister of State for Security Ben Wallace has warned that the government's patience is "running out fast" with Internet firms which prefer profits to public safety.

    Britain's perceived current terrorism threat adds significantly to it becoming the most vulnerable it has been in one hundred years, according to UK Minister of State for Security Ben Wallace.

    He cited "encryption" and the "radicalization" of online content, which he said have led to a situation where "the cost of that is heaped on [Britain'] law enforcement agencies."

    "I have to have more human surveillance. It's costing hundreds of millions of pounds. If they [internet firms] continue to be less than cooperative, we should look at things like tax as a way of incentivizing them or compensating for their inaction," Wallace pointed out.

    A London evening newspaper stand displays their headline outside Paddington tube station in London, after a terrorist incident was declared at Parsons Green subway station Friday, Sept. 15, 2017.
    © AP Photo / Andrew Matthews
    A London evening newspaper stand displays their headline outside Paddington tube station in London, after a terrorist incident was declared at Parsons Green subway station Friday, Sept. 15, 2017.

    He explained that the government "should look at all options," including taxation, because hefty sum are spent on people's de-radicalization and because "content is not taken down as quickly as they [web companies] could do." 

    Wallace also noted that despite these companies' determination to grapple with child abuse online, they "don't seem to be making the same effort" against extremism.

    READ MORE: UK Prime Minister Theresa May Blames Internet for Terrorism, Internet Bites Back

    Speaking to BBC Newsnight on December 13, former MI6 head Sir Richard Dearlove suggested that terrorism does not represent a "systemic threat" to the UK.

    He claimed that "the chances of getting caught up in a terror attack, even when the [terror threat] is high, are relatively low."

    READ MORE: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy? Corbyn Says UK Foreign Policy to Blame for Terrorism

    His comments stand in sharp contrast to those of Andrew Parker, current director general of MI5, who said in October that the UK faced its most severe terror threat in history.

    In all, terrorist attacks have claimed the lives of 35 people in four separate strikes in the UK in 2017.

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    radicalization, government, terrorism, surveillance, tax, Internet, Britain
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