Listen Live
    Rare two-headed timber rattlesnake discovered in New Jersey by two environmental specialists

    Photo: US Environmental Specialists Discover Rare Two-Headed Rattlesnake

    © Screenshot/6abc Philadelphia
    Environment
    Get short URL
    252
    Subscribe

    Two specialists with New Jersey’s Herpetological Associates of Burlington County recently came upon a rare and jaw-dropping discovery - a newborn two-headed timber rattlesnake.

    The two employees, Dave Schneider and Dave Burkett, made the discovery on August 25 while checking out a nest that they noted had been taken up by a pregnant female snake. It was during the birthing period that the pair of specialists spotted the two-headed reptile and captured it.

    Rare two-headed timber rattlesnake discovered by two specialists with New Jersey's Herpetological Associates of Burlington County
    Rare two-headed timber rattlesnake discovered by two specialists with New Jersey's Herpetological Associates of Burlington County

    “It probably wouldn’t be able to survive in the wild,” Bob Zappalorti, the company’s CEO, told NJ Advance Media. “As it was crawling, there’s a chance it could have gotten snagged on something, leaving it open to be eaten by predators.”

    “It’s the only one ever found in New Jersey … It probably was meant to be a twin, and it mutated, and the female gave birth to this abnormal baby,” he added.

    Speaking to local media outlet WPVI, Schneider revealed that although both heads appear to act independently of one another, the venomous snake’s right head does seem to be the more dominant of the two.

    Since dubbed “Double Dave,” the roughly 10-inch snake will remain in Herpetological Associates’ care.

    Related:

    Two for One Special? Man Catches Fish that was Already Caught by Snake that Wouldn't Let Go
    Drunk Indian Villager Bites Poisonous Snake After Getting Bitten
    Tangled Snakes Make Surprise Appearance on Man’s Porch
    Squirming Snake-Like ‘UFO’ Spotted Over NY State Amid Conspiracy Theories of US Air Force Links
    Hungry Snake Trying to Eat Its Own Tail
    Tags:
    two heads, New Jersey, Snake
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik