18:51 GMT19 April 2021
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    The Myanmar military overthrew the country's elected government on 1 February and declared a one-year state of emergency after it accused politicians of rigging the 8 November general elections.

    The United Nations envoy for Myanmar has called 3 March the "bloodiest" day since the February coup, with 38 people dead.

    United Nations Special Envoy on Myanmar, Swiss diplomat Christine Schraner Burgener, said that police have used machine guns against protesters, citing videos submitted by activists.

    According to Schraner Burgener, dozens of people have died in the protests since 1 February.

    "We have now more than over 50 people died since the coup started and many are wounded," Burgener said during the Wednesday briefing.  

    Schraner Burgener added that a "real war" was now possible in Myanmar. She called for "strong measures" against the country's army over the coup.

    "It's not an internal affair; it takes the stability of the region. We know that ethnic armed organizations are determined not to allow this to continue. They also said that they'd suspend the dialogue with the Tatmadaw [Myanmar military]. If both sides start to use violence, then we have a situation of a real war in Myanmar," the official said.

    Chin refugees from Myanmar shout slogans during a protest against military coup in Myanmar, in New Delhi, India, Wednesday, March 3, 2021
    © AP Photo / Altaf Qadri
    Chin refugees from Myanmar shout slogans during a protest against military coup in Myanmar, in New Delhi, India, Wednesday, March 3, 2021

    Protests have rocked Myanmar since early February when the military detained the country’s civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi, President Win Myint, and several top officials.

    At least 17 deaths were reported on Sunday following clashes between the police and demonstrators, who are calling for Aung San Suu Kyi's release. 

    San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy party is facing accusations that it rigged the 8 November elections. Following the February coup, Myanmar's military leader Min Aung Hlaing said the country's election commision had used the COVID-19 pandemic as an excuse to prevent fair campaigning and that the authorities failed to fulfill their duties as a result.

    The UN and United States have condemned the violence against the protesters.

    US State Department Spokesman Ned Price called upon the military to "relinquish power and restore the democratically elected government."

    Tags:
    coup, military, protests, Myanmar
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