17:38 GMT +316 October 2019
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    Surging waves hit against the breakwater behind fishing boats as Typhoon Hagibis approaches at a port in town of Kiho, Mie prefecture, central Japan Saturday

    Super Typhoon Hagibis Death Toll in Japan Hits 14, Dozens Injured, 16 More Remain Missing - Report

    © AP Photo / Toru Hanai
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    MOSCOW (Sputnik) - Local media earlier reported, citing Japanese meteorologists, that Super Typhoon Hagibis could become more destructive than Typhoon Ida, which killed over 1,000 in 1958.

    The number of people who've died as a result of Typhoon Hagibis in Japan has increased to 14, while at least 16 more remain missing, the Kyodo news agency reported on Sunday.

    The TBS broadcaster reported that the disaster had left about 150 people injured.

    Earlier NHK said that at least 8 people had been killed and more than 100 injured, adding that at least 16 people remain missing.

    Japanese authorities earlier on Saturday issued the highest weather emergency level for seven of the nation's prefectures, including Tokyo, due to approaching Super Typhoon Hagibis.

    Some 4.2 million residents in 10 Japanese prefectures, including Tokyo Metropolis, have been ordered to evacuate.

    Japanese airports earlier cancelled 1,929 international and domestic flights due to the approaching storm. Local railway carriers announced mass traffic suspensions.

    According to NHK, some 45,000 people face power outages in the prefectures of Chiba and Kanagawa and Tokyo Metropolis.

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    death toll, damage, Japan, Super Typhoon Hagibis
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