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Germanwings Co-Pilot 'Obsessed' With French Alps, Knew Crash Site

© AFP 2021 / Anne-Christine PoujoulatA helicopter of the French civil security services flies near Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps.
A helicopter of the French civil security services flies near Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps. - Sputnik International
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Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, who intentionally flew an Airbus 320 into a French mountainside on Tuesday, was well-acquainted with the crash area.

Passengers are silhouetted against a window at the Germanwings check-in desk at Dusseldorf airport March 24, 2015. - Sputnik International
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MOSCOW (Sputnik) — Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, who intentionally flew an Airbus 320 into a French mountainside on Tuesday, had an obsession with the Alps and was well-acquainted with the crash area, Le Parisien reported.

Members of the Montabaur flight school, where Lubitz took lessons, told the French newspaper that the co-pilot had flown a glider over the region.

"Andreas participated in courses in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence with my niece, who was a good friend to him. He was passionate about the Alps, and even obsessed. I am sure that he knew the crash area well as he had flown over it in a glider," Dieter Wagner, a member of Montabaur flight school, said quoted by Le Parisien on Friday.

Police hold media away from the house where Andreas Lubitz lived in Montabaur, Germany. - Sputnik International
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Another club member Ernst Muller also confirmed that Lubitz had taken part in at least one or two courses in Sisteron, a town in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, some 70 kilometers (43 miles) from the crash area.

Lufthansa's low-cost airline Germanwings' Airbus A320, en route from Barcelona to Dusseldorf, crashed on Tuesday in the French Alps, killing all 150 people on board.

On Thursday, a French prosecutor asserted that the plane's co-pilot Andreas Lubitz locked the pilot out of the cockpit and intentionally crashed the aircraft.

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