06:49 GMT05 December 2020
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    Joining the bandwagon in celebrating the spooky holiday of Halloween, the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has released pictures of cosmic findings in space called the "Bat Shadow", "Cosmic Candy", and "Sinister Sounds of the Solar System".

    The extravaganza was just in time for Halloween as NASA's Hubble telescope spotted an eerie shadow of a giant jack-o'-lantern hanging in the glittering sky.

    Glowing in orange hues, the giant pumpkin with two glowing eyes and crooked carved smile is a snapshot of the early stages of a collision between two galaxies, said NASA.

    "The entire view is nearly 109,000 light-years across, approximately the diameter of our Milky Way", it said.

    NASA explained that the orange glow of the formation is due to ageing red stars in two galaxies and sinister blue smile is due to "newborn star clusters".

    For the bright eyes, researchers explained it as a concentration of stars around a pair of supermassive black holes.

    Galaxies lose their spiral shape when they collide in the universe and take the form of a football, creating an elliptical galaxy. The scientists believe that this may result in the construction of a bigger spiral galaxy. 

    Last week, NASA also released videos and pictures of out-of-this-world entries for Halloween decorations, showing the shadow of a giant cosmic bat and a piece of cosmic candy.

    While the bat was formed due to a planet pulling on the disk and warping it, the cosmic candy was actually the "outer layers of a dying Sun-like star". 

    ​On Wednesday, NASA dropped its latest mixtape, entitled "Sinister Sounds of the Solar System", on audio distribution website SoundCloud, offering interested listeners a chance to hear data converted into audio after being recorded by a variety of instruments.

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    Listen: NASA Releases New ‘Sinister’ Cosmic Sounds in Time for Halloween
    Tags:
    Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble Telescope, Space, decoration, pumpkin, Halloween, Halloween, NASA
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