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    In this Nov. 5, 2014, file photo, Shane McKee, co-founder of Shango Premium Cannabis medical marijuana dispensary, pulls a sample from their display of cannabis flowers in Portland, Ore. Oregon voters have spoken on marijuana legalization and now legislators want their say. Though the legislative session is more than two weeks away, lawmakers have already introduced more than a dozen bills related to pot.

    Pediatricians Demand DEA Reclassify Marijuana for Medical Research

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    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has requested reclassifying marijuana as a less harmful substance, allowing more research for pediatric use.

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    © Flickr / Aldo Tapia/http://bit.ly/1v3LJ4o
    The medical group recommends that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reschedules marijuana from a Schedule I controlled substance, high potential for abuse and illegal, to a Schedule II, which means having less restrictions on its research, according to a policy statement released on Monday.

    The AAP does not support legalizing pot, but it strongly encourages pediatricians to “advocate for laws that prevent harsh criminal penalties for possession or use of marijuana.”

    This Jan. 13, 2015 file photo, shows parents of children who suffer from epilepsy. With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation's most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy.
    This Jan. 13, 2015 file photo, shows parents of children who suffer from epilepsy. With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation's most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy.

    Doctors are not certain the drug helps children, and they are pretty sure it could harm developing brains. AAP says it should “only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option.”

    Some parents believe their kids have been cured from diseases by cannabis, and researchers would like to be able to confirm such claims by conducting research on the drug. 

    According to DEA classifications, pot falls in the same category as heroin and LSD, which are illegal to use. AAP wants to put it in the same group as Oxycodone and methadone- both used for pain treatment. 

    The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has already started reviewing the medical evidence on marijuana. Although it has not advocated its legalization, it announced that it is “aware that there is considerable interest in its use in treating medical conditions like glaucoma, AIDS wasting syndrome, neuropathic pain, cancer, multiple sclerosis, chemotherapy-induced nausea, and certain seizure disorders."

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