14:13 GMT23 September 2020
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    Scientists at Ural Federal University (UrFU), together with their colleagues from India, have developed the world’s first method to industrially synthesise highly stable perovskites.

    According to the authors of the study, the development allows to effectively use the substances, recognised by Science Journal as breakthrough materials, in energy and electronics. The study's results were published in Materials Science in Semiconductor Processing.

    Perovskites are a class of minerals with a pseudo-cubic crystal structure. According to scientists, since 2012, perovskites have been actively studied as an extremely promising material for a number of areas, especially solar energy.

    Today, the efficiency of perovskite elements is already about 25%, which is comparable to semiconductors. Moreover, their manufacture technology is much simpler, and they can be placed on any flexible surface, from paper to clothing.

    However, perovskites’ practical application is still limited, since the existing production methods don’t provide the required material stability. Perovskite layers degrade within a few hours at room temperature.

    Powder perovskites developed by researchers at UrFU and the Sathyabama Institute of Science and Technology (India) have shown high stability, sufficient for technical application. According to the scientists, the material’s properties haven’t changed during the year of observations.

    "In fact, we are the first to find a way to produce perovskites on a large scale. It’s possible to increase the substance’s stability by high crystallinity and decreased grain boundaries. This opens up great opportunities to fully use such materials in the future", Rajesh Kumar Manavalan, the author of the study and researcher at the Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials at UrFU, said.

    By means of chemical treatment with a high-temperature anti-solvent method, the scientists have managed to synthesise a whole series of perovskite powders: MAPbI3, MAPbBr3, FAPbI3, FAPbBr3, CsPbI3, and CsPbBr3. As the authors of the study explained, this production method is very simple and is not time consuming.

    UrFU specialists also studied the structural, optical, and morphological properties of the obtained substances. They were also the first to study the temperature-dependent phase transition of perovskites.

    In the future, the research team wants to improve the technology for commercial use.

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    energy, materials, scientists, Russia
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