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    New Delhi (Sputnik): India’s capital has been experiencing its coldest December since 1901, with dense fog, cold waves, and the mercury dropping to just one degree sending shivers down the spines of Delhites.

    On Monday, the Indian capital New Delhi woke up to a hazy morning, quivering at 2.5 degrees Celsius. 

    Metro lines, trains, and flights running within and towards New Delhi have been delayed, cancelled or diverted last minute due to almost “no-visibility”, adding to the inconvenience of residents as well as travellers.

    As a virtual warm hug to conquer mutual suffering, netizens took to Twitter and shared videos, pictures and one-liners with fellow frostbitten office-goers.

    #DelhiWinters has consistently been trending on Twitter in India.

    Due to the fog, visibility on the roads in the national capital region (NCR) has been reduced to a minimum.

    On Sunday night, a car carrying six people skidded off a road and fell straight into a canal in Noida, a satellite city inthe national capital region because of low visibility. All of the passengers, including two minors were killed in the accident.

    According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Delhi witnessed its 16th consecutive “severely cold day” on Sunday, 29 December.

    Train and Air services were also badly affected, with airlines announcing delays on social media.

    ​Northern Railways had to press snow cutters into service in the Kashmir region to restore train services, as the region was completely enveloped in snow.

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    Tags:
    Twitter, Winters, Delhi International Airport Private Limited (DIAL), Delhi Metro, New Delhi, Delhi
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