13:03 GMT +316 October 2019
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    UK MPs Reject Plan to Hold More Indicative Votes on Brexit Options Next Week

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    A series of indicative votes has been held in the UK parliament to see whether there is a majority for an alternative Brexit plan, but no motion has secured the needed support.

    UK lawmakers have tied in a vote on a plan to hold more indicative votes on Brexit options, with 310 MPs voting against and 310 for, Reuters reported.

    According to the Parliament's rules, the speaker of the House has tie-breaking power.

    Speaker John Bercow cast his vote with the noes, saying that was in keeping with the principle that "it is not for the chair to create a majority that otherwise doesn't exist".

    The PM's spokesman stated that UK Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had had a "constructive exploratory discussion about how to break the deadlock" with Theresa May.

    READ MORE: Austrian Chancellor Kurz Says No Reason for Another Brexit Deadline Extension

    European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said earlier that the European Union would agree to a short-term Brexit extension only if the United Kingdom approves a withdrawal deal by 12 April.

    The British Parliament has already rejected the withdrawal deal three times. After the second rejection, the European Council granted the United Kingdom a Brexit extension until 22 May if the Parliament managed to pass the deal by 29 March. As the deal was voted down, the United Kingdom now has until 12 April to come up with a new solution or it risks leaving without a deal.

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    no deal, deal, vote, Brexit, UK Parliament, European Union, United Kingdom
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