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    BSI: German MP Informed BSI in December of Suspicious Activity on Private E-mail

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    Reports come just a day after hackers published the personal information of hundreds of German politicians on Twitter, including ID scans and private messages, phone numbers, and home addresses.

    According to the German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), German lawmakers informed the agency of the suspicious activity in early December. The BSI stressed, however, that it did not have knowledge of any plan to release the stolen information until 3 January, when the latest breach was able to be connected to the previous cases.

    "Only by becoming aware of the release of the data sets via the Twitter Account 'G0d' on Jan. 3, 2019, could the BSI in a further analysis on Jan. 4, 2019 connect this case and four other cases that the BSI became aware of during 2018", the agency said in a statement.

    READ MORE: Berlin Asks Top US Spy Agency to Help Investigate Mass Governmental Hack

    The breach compromised the personal data of politicians from regional parliaments, the federal parliament, and the European Parliament, the German government stated earlier.

    According to media reports, all German parties represented in the Bundestag were hit by the hacker operation, except for the Alternative for Germany (AfD) party.

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    personal data breach, data breach, hacking, BSI, Germany
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