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    A general view shows the main entrance to Salisbury District Hospital in Salisbury, southern England, on March 6, 2018.

    A Month in Sergei Skripal's Health: From Critical Condition to Rapid Improvement

    © AFP 2018 / Chris J Ratcliffe
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    Sergei Skripal is no longer in critical condition, according to the British medics’ Friday report. It has been almost a month since the former Russian spy has been poisoned in Salisbury, Britain. How has his condition progressed since March 4? Here is what we know so far.

     

    • On March 4, Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found unconscious on a bench near The Maltings shopping center in Salisbury. According to March 7 by Met police, the Skripals were being treated for suspected exposure to an unknown substance and both remained in a critical condition in intensive care.
    • On March 13, the Met police referred to reports of Mr. Skripal remaining in a critical condition in hospital "after being exposed to a nerve agent in a targeted attack." 
    • March 17 and the Skripals still remained in critical condition in hospital, while British scientists determined this to be the result of a military grade nerve agent, as stated by the Met police
    • On March 29, the British National Health Service (NHS) issued a statement saying that Julia Skripal was recovering.
    • On April 5, UK's Met police issued a statement on behalf of Yulia Skripal who said she "woke up over a week ago now" and is glad her strength is "growing daily." No mention, however, was made of the health condition of her father Sergei, who was still believed to be in critical condition in the hospital.
    • Finally on April 6, Christine Blanshard, Medical Director at Salisbury District Hospital, said in a statement that Sergei Skripal "is responding well to treatment, improving rapidly and is no longer in a critical condition."

     

    In this file photo taken on March 8, 2018 members of the emergency services in green biohazard encapsulated suits re-affix the tent over the bench where Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found in critical condition on March 4 at The Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury, southern England
    © AFP 2018 / Ben STANSALL
    In this file photo taken on March 8, 2018 members of the emergency services in green biohazard encapsulated suits re-affix the tent over the bench where Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found in critical condition on March 4 at The Maltings shopping centre in Salisbury, southern England

    Following the Salisbury incident, Britain accused Moscow of complicity in the poisoning, initiating a series of measures in response, including the expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats. In turn, Russia has rejected London's allegations, citing lack of evidence and calling for a joint investigation into the Skripal case.

    Earlier this week, the head of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) at Porton Down admitted that contrary to London's claims, researchers have failed to prove the A-234 substance, allegedly used for Skripals' poisoning, was made in Russia.

    Related:

    Sergei Skripal Out of Critical Condition, Responding to Treatment - Hospital
    Slovakia Sees No Reason to Break Ties With Russia Over Skripal Case - Senior MP
    'Strength is Growing Daily': What We Know So Far About Yulia Skripal's Awakening
    Tags:
    poison, health, Yulia Skripal, Sergei Skripal, Russia, United Kingdom
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