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    An Anti-Brexit protestor's hat displays the words 'Stop Brexit' as he stands outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain December 5, 2017.

    That Skeptic Isle: Brits Still Divided on Brexit, but Most Expect It to Go Badly

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    New polling conducted and led by Professor John Curtice of Strathclyde University published December 6 showed British society remains more or less even on whether the move to leave the European Union is the right one - but a clear majority are not optimistic about the result to the negotiations with Brussels.

    The number of Britons expecting a bad outcome to the Brexit negotiations reached 52 percent in October compared to 37 percent at the beginning of 2017.

    Those expecting a positive post-Brexit arrangement with EU now represent only 28 percent.

    The study showed more than Brexit itself, the British public are critical of Prime Minister Theresa May’s handling of the process, with 61 percent believing she is managing the negotiations poorly.

    READ MORE: UK PM Player 'With No Weapons' Amid DUP-Ireland Stalemate & Brexit Deal Break Up

    ​Respondents didn’t display much positivity towards Brussels either, 57 percent took a negative view of the EU’s approach to Brexit, with 34 percent viewing 'fairly badly' and 23 percent 'very badly.'

    When asked in October 2017 how they would vote in a hypothetical rerun of the referendum 53 percent said they would vote Remain with 47 percent who would have voted to Leave.

    British Prime Minister Theresa May (L) is welcomed by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker at the EC headquarters in Brussels, Belgium October 21, 2016.
    © REUTERS/ Yves Herman
    British Prime Minister Theresa May (L) is welcomed by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker at the EC headquarters in Brussels, Belgium October 21, 2016.

    Observers on social media have become increasingly assertive that enough of the UK public support the holding of a second referendum, hoping it might stop the process.

    The proposal have inevitably invited angry responses from supporters of the Leave Campaign who assert the British public made their decision at the June 2016 referendum and it is undemocratic for the losing side to demand another vote until they get the result they wanted.

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    EU, Brexit, polling, referendum, Brexit, Theresa May, EU, United Kingdom
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