09:15 GMT +317 July 2018
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    Hottest April Day Ever Recorded as Temps Hit 50.2C in Pakistan

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    Areas in Pakistan have now recorded the hottest April day ever as temperatures soared to a scorching 50.2°C on Monday.

    Pakistan, a country familiar with hot weather, was nonetheless shocked by the out-of-character heatwave, which pushed temperatures well past dangerous levels and much higher than the usual seasonal norm of 18-24C.

    The Pakistan Meteorological Department acknowledged that a record-breaking high temperature had been set on April 30 in the city of Nawabshah.

    Heatstroke felled dozens as almost every business activity in the region "came to a halt," according to the Pakistani newspaper Dawn.

    Weather expert Chris Burt claimed that the measurement coincided with that of the hottest reliable April temperature reading "in modern records for any location on Earth," cited by Metro.co.uk.

    Monday's Pakistani reading was not confirmed by the World Meteorological Organization, which does not keep global temperature records according to month, cited by the Washington Post.

    A large offshore high-pressure ‘heat dome' in the Indian Ocean is said to be responsible for the strange weather.

    The meteorological phenomenon brought record highs to Pakistan's Nawabshah in March, setting another national heat record for that month.

    As global warming increases due to human-induced climate change, deaths increase as well.

    A June 2016, a heatwave in Karachi, Pakistan's biggest urban area, killed over 1,000.

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    Tags:
    heatwave, climate change, global warming, World Meteorological Organization, Pakistan, Earth
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