13:51 GMT +321 September 2019
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    Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, Rwanda's President Paul Kagame, Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, pose for a family photo at the G7 summit in Biarritz, France

    'Unidentified Leader': South Africans Infuriated by US Journalist Failing to Recognise Country's President at G7 Meeting

    © REUTERS / Andrew Parsons
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    Despite facing a certain degree of criticism at home over domestic policies, many South Africans and other netizens were angered by the journalist being oblivious as to who Cyril Ramaphosa is.

    Associated Press reporter Darlene Superville has drawn criticism online following a tweet featuring a photo of the heads of France, India, Canada and South Africa at the G7 meeting. However, it was not the photo itself that infuriated netizens, but the fact that the reporter had failed to recognise South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, referring to him simply as “unidentified leader”, while naming everyone else.

    Twitterians suggested that Superville was not good at her job because, in their opinion, she should have recognised the head of states visiting the important annual event, or could at least have googled Ramaphosa.

    One netizen noted that if Superville had not been a person of colour, the public and media would already have been infuriated by such a tweet.

    Many South Africans were infuriated by the fact that their president was the only one "unidentified" in the photo, despite his face being clearly visible.

    However, some netizens critical of Ramaphosa claimed that the AP journalist not recognising him only proves his alleged lack of fitness for the position he is holding.

    Ramaphosa has been facing criticism, both domestically and abroad, in recent years over some of his policies. The most controversial is the intention to redistribute farmland belonging to local white farmers among the black population without giving compensation to the former. Critics point out that a similar policy led to the collapse of the agricultural sector in another African state, Zimbabwe.

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    Canada, India, France, Twitter reaction, South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa, G7
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