01:14 GMT +315 November 2019
Listen Live
    In this March 8, 2014, file photo steam from the Jeffrey Energy Center coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the setting sun near St. Marys, Kan.

    EPA Says ‘Not Necessary’ for Coal Plants to Comply With Mercury Limits

    © AP Photo / Charlie Riedel, File
    US
    Get short URL
    0 12
    Subscribe

    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - The Trump Administration has determined that it is unnecessary and too costly to regulate hazardous air pollutants (HAP) emanating from US coal and oil-fired power plants as outlined in current mercury standards, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said in a press release on Friday.

    "This action proposes… to make a revised determination that it is not appropriate and necessary to regulate HAP emissions from coal- and oil-fired power plants," the release said. "A proper consideration of costs under section 112(n) of the Clean Air Act demonstrates that the total projected costs of compliance with the MATS [Mercury and Air toxic Standards] rule ($7.4 to $9.6 billion annually) dwarfs the monetized HAP benefits of the rule ($4 to $6 million annually)."

    The EPA’s action, the release added, only proposes to correct flaws in MATS supplemental findings and is not proposing to "de-list" such power plants from the list of sources that are regulated under the Clean Air Act.

    READ MORE: ‘Rotten' Math: EPA Wants to Let Power Plants Pump Mercury Into Air Again

    The agency said it will eventually hold a hearing on the matter after taking comments on the proposal for two months from the date published in the federal register.

    Related:

    EPA Chief Faces Lawsuit Over Alleged Boosting Fuel Profits Ignoring Health Issue
    EPA's 'Farcical' Climate Hearing in WV; Trump's Anti-Muslim Tweets
    Latest Buzz: US EPA Approves Use of Lab-Grown Mosquitoes to Kill Wild Mosquitoes
    Tags:
    plant, coal, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik