00:38 GMT +322 July 2018
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    Antibiotics

    Deadly Antibiotic-Proof 'Nightmare Bacteria' Creeps Upon the United States

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    A dangerous breed of bacteria highly resistant to antibiotics is becoming increasingly widespread in the United States, raising concerns among the country’s health officials.

    Last year the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had detected over 220 cases of a “nightmare bacteria” that exhibits a high resistance to antibiotics, which makes it "virtually untreatable," USA Today reports.

    Also, the CDC lab network that was set up in 2016 to deal with this particular problem has discovered that about a quarter of the germ samples studied by them contain genes that allow these germs to spread their antibiotics resistance to other bacteria.

    "There are certain bacterial genes that are more worrisome than others, that are much harder to treat. These genes are lurking in American patients and they are spreading in hospitals and health care facilities,” said Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

    According to the media outlet, about 2 million people in the United States fall ill, and 23,000 die, each year due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Earlier, researchers in Northern Germany also raised the alarm after finding in water a pathogen that can’t be killed even by last-ditch antibiotics.

    READ MORE: Deadly Bacteria Resistant to “Last Resort” Meds Found in German Lakes, Streams

    A study conducted in the German state of Lower Saxony has found not only multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRGN bacteria) but strains which can't be killed by so-called drugs of "last resort."

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    drug-resistant bacteria, reports, warning, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), United States
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