03:18 GMT04 March 2021
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    The majority of US voters consider alleged Russian hack attacks not to negatively affect the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

    NEW YORK (Sputnik) — The majority of US voters say they believe the alleged Russian hack attacks during the 2016 presidential election did not affect the outcome of the vote, new Morning Consult/Politico poll revealed on Wednesday.

    "Forty-five percent say they do not believe the hacks affected the election, while just 36 percent say they did," the poll indicated.

    The poll was conducted a day after US president-elect Donald Trump held his first press conference on January 11 following the US Congress confirmation of his election victory.

    The respondents were asked to express their views on a series of comments Trump made during the press conference, including his remark that maintaining decent relationship with Russia's president Vladimir Putin should be viewed "as an asset, not a liability."

    "[Thirty] percent say Putin liking Trump would be an ‘asset,’ 27 percent say it is a ‘liability,’ and another 27 percent say it is neither an asset nor a liability," the poll found.

    On January 10, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper acknowledged in a congressional hearing that US intelligence did not see evidence of Russia altering US vote tallies.

    Russian officials have repeatedly denied Moscow interfered in the US election, noting that the allegations of hacking were designed to deflect public opinion from revealed instances of corruption and other pressing domestic concerns.

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    Tags:
    poll, hacking, cybersecurity, 2016 US Presidential Run, James Clapper, US
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