10:38 GMT25 February 2020
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    Under the $150 million deal the US will provide Bahrain with support, communications and training equipment, ammunition, spare and repair parts, as well as technical, logistics, and engineering support services.

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    WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — The US State Department has endorsed a $150 million sale of fighter jets parts and equipment for Bahrain’s existing F-16 fighter jets fleet, US Defense Security Cooperation Agency said in a press release on Friday.

    “The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Bahrain for F-16 follow-on support and associated equipment, parts and logistics for an estimated cost of $150 million,” the press release read.

    Under the deal, Bahrain will receive support, communications and training equipment, ammunition, spare and repair parts, as well as technical, logistics, and engineering support services, according to the agency.

    “The proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping improve the security of a Major Non-North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Ally, which has been and continues to be a key security partner in the region,” the release concluded.

    The agency added the potential sale would not impact US defense readiness.

    The Royal Bahrain Air Force has bought a total of 22 F-16 jets through two military sales programs in 1990 and 2000.

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    Tags:
    U.S. Department of State, deal, F-16 fighter jet, Royal Bahrain Air Force, US Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Bahrain, United States
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