19:03 GMT05 August 2021
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    The Man Who Blames Himself for George W. Bush's 2000 'Victory'

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    On today's BradCast, oil prices crash, Sanders surges in both Iowa and New Hampshire, the GOP tries to find an alternative to Trump, we're joined by the mathematician who says that the George W. Bush "Presidency" was his fault...sort of, and we discuss why it all still matters today.

    First up, Desi Doyen joins us to discuss the importance of and reasons for the plunging price of oil, which fell below $30/barrel today for the first time since 2003.

    Next, new polling out of both Iowa and New Hampshire suggest the potential for very close races, on both the Democratic and Republican side of the aisle, this year.

    Bernie Sanders, who had been trailing Hillary Clinton in IA for months, has now overtaken her there, according to new numbers, and has increased his lead in NH over the woman still described by corporate media as "the Democratic front-runner".

    On the GOP side of the aisle, Trump retains his lead in NH, while IA tightens and the search for an "establishment" alternative takes a few surprising turns.

    Then, speaking of close elections, we're joined by Dr. John Allen Paulos, professor of mathematics at Temple University to discuss the mother of all close elections, and why he believes his November 22, 2000 NYTimes op-ed helped lead directly to the U.S. Supreme Court stopping the ballot count in the Sunshine State, resulting in their (s)election of George W. Bush.

    After I recount (pardon the pun), just some of the chicanery and still-unexplained anomalies that resulted in the exceedingly close tallies reported by Florida in 2000, Paulos, author of the New York Times best-seller, Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences and, his latest, A Numerate Life: A Mathematician Explores the Vagaries of Life, His Own and Probably Yours, explains how he still "regrets" his mathematical analysis of the race at the time, which ended up being cited by the courts during the legal battle that eventually stopped the tally of paper ballots in Florida.

    (For the record, yes, had Florida counted all of the ballots in the state at the time, as the Times reported on September 12, 2001 — so you are forgiven, if you didn't notice, Gore would likely have won the state, "no matter what standard was chosen to judge voter intent.")

    "People talk about the 'Butterfly Effect' in dynamical systems (ed note: as opposed to the Butterflly Ballots in Palm Beach County, FL!), where tiny little initial differences lead to huge disparities down the road. This was, in a sense, a case where I was the little butterfly flapping its wings in South America leading, after many intermediate events, to a hurricane in New Orleans."

    "In retrospect, obviously, I wish I hadn't done that," Paulos tells me about his op-ed, published 15 years ago last month, adding: "As a moral tiebreaker, Gore won almost half a million more votes nationwide. At the very least, they should have flipped a coin" and "Oh, yeah, they should have counted the ballots. That's what should have happened."

    Finally, speaking of the consequences of elections and actually counting votes to determine the intent of voters, we conclude today's show by discussing how the George W. Bush administration allowed North Korea to obtain the atomic bombs that the rogue nation is once again using to threaten the world. Yes, more fallout from the disastrous Bush Administration, still affecting us today because we failed to count the voters' ballots.

    You can find Brad’s previous editions here.

    And tune in to radio Sputnik one hour a day, five days a week.

    Tags:
    New Hampshire, US, Florida, Iowa, Al Gore, Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, The Times, Democrats, Republicans, GOP, 2016 US Presidential Run, USelections, George W. Bush, atomic bomb, Democratic Republic of North Korea (DPRK)
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