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    This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days

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    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    • This is What Life Looks Like in DPRK During New Year Holidays and Work Days
    © AFP 2017/ Kim Won-Jin
    A girl flies a kite as North Koreans come out to mark the start of 2017 on New Year's Day in Pyongyang, North Korea, on January 1, 2017.

    Just like most people across the globe, North Koreans celebrated the end of 2016 and have now returned back to work.

    Just like most people across the globe, North Koreans celebrated the end of 2016 and have now returned back to work.

    New Year based on the world's most widely used Gregorian calendar is a "foreign" holiday for Korea. Until 1896, before the country adopted the common calendar, Koreans celebrated the beginning of the New Year according to the traditional lunisolar calendar — the holiday usually coincided with Gregorian late January or the first half of February. These days, Koreans have decided to celebrate both New Year's Days.

    Gregorian New Year has become one of the main non-ideological holidays in DPRK; however, there is still an obligatory tradition to lay flowers at the nearest monument to Kim Il-Sung or any other member of his family.

    Tags:
    life, New Year, Democratic Republic of North Korea (DPRK)
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