02:16 GMT15 May 2021
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    The UK Crown Prosecution Service reported that the police have found the evidence the teenager was plotting a terrorist attack, saying that he would be sentenced later.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) — The Birmingham Crown Court has found a teenager guilty of plotting an attack in Wales this summer, the UK Crown Prosecution Service reported on Monday.

    "A teenager has been convicted today (27 November) of planning to drive a car into a crowd of people in Cardiff in a Daesh-inspired terror attack. Targets he researched included Cardiff Castle, the New Theatre, the Capitol shopping centre, the Central Library and a Justin Bieber concert taking place on 30 June this year," the statement, issued on the CPS website, read.

    According to the statement, the police found a rucksack at the teenager's room with a knife, a hummer and a so-called martyrdom letter which said "a soldier of the Islamic State and I have attacked Cardiff today."

    The teenager posted photos of terrorists on his Instagram account and searched in the Internet information related to committing a terror attack, the statement said. He also confessed that a week before the raid he had contacted a man who told him about the necessity of committing a terror attack in order to go to paradise.

    The teenager will be sentenced later, the CPS said.

    The United Kingdom has faced a wave of terror attacks this year, including several car-ramming assaults at Finsbury Park, on London Bridge and Westminster Bridge, as well as the blast that occurred at the entrance to Manchester Arena at the end of US singer Ariana Grande’s concert.

    Related:

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    UK Introduces 15 Year Penalty for Repeatedly Viewing Terrorist Content Online
    Tags:
    terror attack, United Kingdom
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