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    Britain's Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks at a rally in advance of tonight's debate with Owen Smith at a Labour Leadership Campaign event in Glasgow, Scotland, August 25, 2016.

    New Year Message From UK Labour Leader Calls for a United Party

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    After almost a year of infighting, backstabbing and division, Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the UK Labour party has called for a more united party with 2017 an opportunity to "start afresh."

    Many Labour ministers spent most of 2016 trying to oust Mr. Corbyn, a year he has described as being "12 months of enormous change," which will "live long in all our memories."

    In a video message, Mr. Corbyn expressed empathy for Brexit vote: "2016 will be defined in history by the referendum on our EU membership — people didn't trust politicians and they didn't trust the European Union.

    'Not Good Enough'

    The Labour leader's official 2017 statement included a message to the current government, suggesting a deal with the European Union that just protect London bankers is "not good enough." 

    Jeremy Corbyn, who is increasingly viewed as a more populist politician added: 

    "I understand that, I've spent over 40 years in politics campaigning for a better way of doing things. Standing up for people, taking on the establishment and opposing decisions that would make us worse off."

    But he faces a tough year to close the polls with his rivals in Westminster with the Conservative Party — yet he vows to fight on.

    "Those in charge today have put the jobs market, housing, the NHS and social care in crisis. We can't let them mess this up. It's about everyone's future."    

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    unity, leadership, politics, New Year message, New Year, Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, Britain, United Kingdom
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