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    Demonstrators stand outside the High Court during a legal challenge to force the British government to seek parliamentary approval before starting the formal process of leaving the European Union, in London, Britain, October 13, 2016

    Brexit to Require Act of Parliament if Court Ruling on Article 50 Upheld

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    UK Secretary of State for Leaving the EU David Davis stated that the start of Brexit negotiation process needs an act to be passed by both the upper and lower houses of parliament.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) — The UK High Court's decision on the triggering of Article 50 will mean that an act of parliament will need to be passed by both the upper and lower houses of parliament for the Brexit negotiation process to commence, if the ruling is upheld by the Supreme Court, Secretary of State for Leaving the EU David Davis said on Thursday.

    "The judges have laid out what we can't do and not exactly what we can do, but we're presuming it requires an act of parliament therefore both Commons and Lords," Davis told the BBC broadcaster.

    Earlier in the day, the High Court ruled that the United Kingdom cannot trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty without British lawmakers' approval. The UK government is expected to appeal to the Supreme Court following the ruling.

    UK Prime Minister Theresa May previously stated she intends to trigger Article 50 at the end of March 2017.

    On June 23, the United Kingdom held a referendum to determine whether or not the country should leave the 28-nation bloc. According to the final results, some 52 percent of voters decided to support Brexit.

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