19:48 GMT19 April 2021
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    The Warsaw nationalist march that took place on the country’s National Independence Day and resulted in riots serves as an example of tolerance towards extremism leading to disorder, Russia’s Foreign Ministry human rights ombudsman stated Wednesday.

    MOSCOW, November 12 (RIA Novosti) — The nationalist march in Warsaw that took place on the country’s National Independence Day and sparked clashes with riot police is an example of how tolerance towards extremism leads to disorder, Russia’s Foreign Ministry human rights ombudsman Konstantin Dolgov stated Wednesday.

    "The bacchanalia of radical nationalists in Warsaw confirms the danger of connivance towards the extremists, that stir up national hatred, including in Ukraine," Dolgov wrote on his Twitter page.

    • Poland's President Bronislaw Komorowski and his wife Anna (C) walk together with officials during the Independence Day celebrations in Warsaw November 11, 2014
      Poland's President Bronislaw Komorowski and his wife Anna (C) walk together with officials during the Independence Day celebrations in Warsaw November 11, 2014
      © REUTERS / Slawomir Kaminski
    • A wounded riot policeman is attended after several hundred masked men broke away from a far-right march and threw stones and flares in Warsaw November 11, 2014
      A wounded riot policeman is attended after several hundred masked men broke away from a far-right march and threw stones and flares in Warsaw November 11, 2014
      © REUTERS / Jacek Marczewski
    • A protester holds a flare as several hundred masked men broke away from a far-right march and threw stones and flares at lines of riot police in Warsaw November 11, 2014
      A protester holds a flare as several hundred masked men broke away from a far-right march and threw stones and flares at lines of riot police in Warsaw November 11, 2014
      © REUTERS / Kacper Pempel
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    © REUTERS / Slawomir Kaminski
    Poland's President Bronislaw Komorowski and his wife Anna (C) walk together with officials during the Independence Day celebrations in Warsaw November 11, 2014

    The nationalist march in Warsaw took place on Tuesday, Poland's National Independence Day. Radical groups such as Radical Camp and the All-Polish Youth took part in the march that sparked unrest in the city as flares and firecrackers were thrown at riot police that responded with water cannons.

    The annual march turned violent for the fourth consecutive year, this time ending with at least 276 people detained and 50 injured, according to local police.

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    Poland, Warsaw
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