14:04 GMT +321 July 2019
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    Men wearing protective suits and masks work in front of welding storage tanks for radioactive water, under construction in the J1 area at the Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma in Fukushima prefecture. (File)

    TEPCO Finds Possible Nuclear Fuel Debris Under Fukushima's Reactor Number 2

    © AFP 2019 / TORU HANAI
    Asia & Pacific
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    Japanese Tokyo Electric Power Company, Fukushima nuclear power plant's (NPP) operator, has found possible nuclear fuel debris beneath the second Fukushima-1 reactor, damaged in 2011, local media reported Monday.

    TOKYO (Sputnik) According to the Kyodo news agency, the employees of the Japanese company found black substance under the reactor with help of a telescopic arm and are expected to continue explorations in mid-February, using a robot, equipped with a camera.

    The findings are likely to shed light on the state of the fuel, contained inside the damaged reactor, for the first time, in case they prove to be the nuclear fuel debris.

    The explorations will be aimed at identifying the quantity of the possible nuclear fuel debris, that should be eliminated while dealing with the effects of the Fukushima disaster.

    The Fukushima disaster took place in March 2011, as earthquake triggered a tsunami and hit the NPP, leading to the leakage of radioactive materials and the shutdown of the plant. The total of three reactors had been operating at the power plant before the incident.

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    reactor, Fukushima nuclear power plant, TEPCO, Japan
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