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    A pro-Brexit leave the European Union supporter takes part in a protest outside the House of Parliament in London, Wednesday, March 13, 2019.

    'Rebel MPs are Attempting to Subvert Democracy' - Analyst

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    According to reports, Rebel MPs are engaged in talks on plans to amend parliament’s standing orders, a move which if successful could give the House of Commons the power to block a no-deal Brexit.

    Green Party leader Caroline Lucas has made a rallying call, this time for the formation of an all-female cabinet that would aim to secure a second Brexit referendum.

    All of this comes in response to new British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s plan to oversee the UK’s departure from the EU on the revised deadline date of 31 October, with or without a divorce bill.

    The latter scenario is now looking more likely after Brussels reiterated last week that they would not re-open talks on the agreement negotiated between the EU and Theresa May.

    But would blocking a no-deal Brexit even be possible?

    Michael Swadling from the Croydon Constitutionalists thinks that calls for a second Brexit referendum are undemocratic and are against the will of the UK population.

    Sputnik: Are the rebel MPs justified in their attempt to block a no-deal Brexit?

    Michael Swadling: They are attempting to subvert democracy, they’re not trying to block a no-deal Brexit, they are trying to block any form of Brexit, and these are MPs that only accept a vote when they win. Having stood for election a couple of times; the thing you do when the vote comes out, and you’ve not won, is in my experience go up to them, shake their hand, and you accept the democratic outcome.

    These MPs are only prepared to accept when they win, only prepared to accept when the elite gets their way, this is a massively anti-democratic act by them, by trying to block the will of the British people.

    Sputnik: Could Labour lose its support base if it continues to lean towards the pro-remain camp in parliament?

    Michael Swadling: The Labour Party has become a part of London, it’s a party of people who spent the 1980s protesting against Thatcher, protesting in favour of the miners but never actually meeting them, it’s people who’ve barely been north of Watford, they don’t understand the feeling in working-class communities, they are not interested in working-class communities up and down the country.

    In my own experience of campaigning, Labour simply don’t understand the people and areas, and they fail to understand why people might vote for Brexit, and why people feel passionate about their country.

    Sputnik: Does Boris Johnson stand any chance of winning the next general election?

    Michael Swadling: Boris’s only chance of winning a general election is to deliver Brexit, but he’s on track to deliver Brexit and win the next general election.

    It’s not just Brexit. It’s impressive to see the work Priti Patel is doing on crime, that’s a big issue certainly in London and in lots of the parts of the country, Sajid Javid has a much better handle on how to run a business, and how to run an economy than Philip Hammond ever did, so they are moving in the right direction towards where the views of the people are.

    Will Boris do it? I think he will. Once the Prime Minister and the government do something, it’s very likely to happen, the MPs effectively are in their last chance saloon with the people they are meant to represent, they have to get out on 31 October, and I think most MPs when it comes to it, will realise that.


    Views and opinions, expressed in the article are those of Michael Swadling and do not necessarily reflect those of Sputnik.

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