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Protests Rock Brazil With Dilma Rousseff Impeachment Trial Underway

© AP Photo / Ueslei MarcelinoBrazil's President Dilma Rousseff looks on during signing of federal land transfer agreement for the government of the state of Amapa at Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil, April 15, 2016
Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff looks on during signing of federal land transfer agreement for the government of the state of Amapa at Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil, April 15, 2016 - Sputnik International
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With the impeachment trial of suspended Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff back underway, protesters have gathered outside, in a show of solidarity.

Facing accusations of corruption, Rousseff denied any wrongdoing before the Senate on Monday.

"The evidence makes it clear that charges against me are merely pretexts based on fragile judicial rhetoric," she said.

"These are pretexts to overthrow a legitimate government through an impeachment crime without criminal responsibility…We are one step closer to a serious institutional breakdown. We are one step closer to achieving a real coup."

Geopolitical analyst Pepe Escobar told Sputnik that the case against Rousseff was trumped up for political purposes.

"She refuted all these arguments, and she even once again confirmed…that the Brazilian Public ministry said that there is no grounds for a trial based on a 'crime of responsibility,'" Escobar said. "So obviously she is to conclude that this is political persecution, which it is."

In May, the upper house of the Brazilian parliament voted 55-22 to start impeachment proceedings against Rousseff after she was accused of concealing the country’s budget deficit ahead of the 2014 election. Rousseff was suspended from office for 180 days, and Vice President Michel Temer fulfilled the functions of the presidency during that period.

Rousseff’s ouster would have dramatic consequences for the people of Brazil.

"If the impeachment passes, it’s going to be total paralysis, total polarization,…and a country effectively ruled not by a president…but a hugely reactionary, conservative, unrepresentative Brazilian parliament," Escobar said, "and this is a very, very sad story for the nation."

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