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    Uzbekistan-born Grandmaster Plots Blindfold Chess World Record

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    A former child chess prodigy from Uzbekistan turned US Grand Master plans to make history by breaking the world record for the number of chess games played simultaneously while wearing a blindfold, according to a chess website.

    WASHINGTON, September 13 (RIA Novosti) – A former child chess prodigy from Uzbekistan turned US Grand Master plans to make history by breaking the world record for the number of chess games played simultaneously while wearing a blindfold, according to a chess website.

    San Diego-based Timur Gareev, who is ranked by the World Chess Federation as #3 in the United States and #71 globally, claims that he has been “exploring” blindfold chess for one-and-a-half years and has played over 1000 games, according to a blog posted this week on chessbase.com.

    For the world record he will challenge 50 other players, who will be allowed to look at their boards while he remains blindfolded, keeping track of developments in all of the games in his head. He is currently seeking organizers and venues to host the event, Gareev said in his blog.

    Last April, Gareev played 33 games simultaneously in St. Louis while blindfolded. Gareev scored 29 wins and 4 draws in 10 hours and 39 minutes, a result described by event organizer Mike Wilmering as “amazing.”

    Gareev states that blindfold chess is no mere eccentricity but requires "consistent intensity and duration of thought. … Developing powerful concentration is one of the major benefits of playing multiple games blindfolded.”

    Gareev was born in Tashkent, capital of the then-Soviet republic of Uzbekistan, in 1988 and became the youngest ever Grand Master from Asia at age 16, according to chessharmony.com. He moved to the United States in 2005 and has won numerous national contests since.

     

    Tags:
    chess, World Chess Championships, Uzbekistan
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