20:03 GMT17 January 2021
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    Nokian Tyres Plant in Vsevolozhsk Celebrates 10 Years

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    Nokian Tyres Russia has 13 operational production lines with a total annual capacity of 15.5 million tires. Over 50 percent of the plant’s output is exported to 40 countries.

    St. Petersburg (Sputnik) – Finland’s Nokian Tyres, which is marking the 10 year anniversary of its factory in Vsevolozhsk, has received a certificate as a strategic economic partner from the Leningrad Region authorities, the regional government said in a press release.

    “The Nokian Tyres plant, which opened 10 years ago, is our strategic partner. Leningrad Region Governor Alexander Drozdenko has granted the plant a certificate of recognition for its contribution to the region’s socioeconomic development,” the release says.

    The groundbreaking ceremony for the plant was held in June 2004, and the plant manufactured its first tires exactly a year later. Total investment in the project has reached 800 million euros since 2004.

    “It’s important for us that the company is one of the region’s 20 largest taxpayers. We hope our cooperation will continue. The Leningrad Region is proud to have the world’s most modern tire plant,” Drozdenko said, as quoted by his press service.

    According to the governor, Nokian Tyres makes broad use of local tax incentives.

    President and CEO of Nokian Tyres Ari Lehtoranta said at the ceremony that 10 years ago they planned to produce 8 million tires a year, but since then the plant increased its annual output to about 16 million.

    Nokian Tyres Russia has 13 operational production lines with a total annual capacity of 15.5 million tires. Over 50 percent of the plant’s output is exported to 40 countries.

    The plant in Vsevolozhsk has a staff of over 1,300 people, but more jobs will be available when it reaches its design capacity.

    Tags:
    tyres, plant, Nokian, Finland, Vsevolozhsk, Leningrad Region, Russia
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