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    The Critical Hour

    Hong Kong Protests Continue: Is This a Restrained Government vs. Violent Protesters?

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    On today’s episode of The Critical Hour, Dr. Wilmer Leon is joined by K.J. Noh, peace activist and scholar on the geopolitics of the Asian continent who writes for CounterPunch and Dissident Voice. He is special correspondent for KPFA Flashpoints on the “Pivot to Asia,” the Koreas and the Pacific.

    Over the weekend, Hong Kong police stormed through barricades at a protester stronghold. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus has been a scene of ferocious clashes between police and protesters, and China’s ambassador to London said Monday that foreign countries, including the US and UK, should stop interfering in Hong Kong’s internal affairs as protesters continued to battle with police. So, what’s going on in Hong Kong now? We are six months into the demonstrations, and based upon how they started, most folks did not expect them to last so long.

    What’s going on in Bolivia since the coup? Is Bolivia becoming more repressive as it tries to declare that a dictator has been removed? In a Monday piece for CounterPunch, Nino Pagliccia says that both Bolivia and Venezuela have been subjected to the "US-promoted Hybrid War for regime change from a socialist government to a more neoliberal pro-US government." Writing in the Global Security Review in August 2018, Joshua Stowell explained that warfare changed in the 21st century: "This change now requires the US and its allies to adopt a new legal, psychological, and strategic understanding of warfare and use of force, particularly by state actors. The term 'hybrid war' (military institutions use the term 'hybrid threat') connotes the use of conventional military force supported by irregular and cyber warfare tactics. In practical application, the Russian concept of 'nonlinear conflict' is an example of a hybrid warfare strategy."

    Texas death row inmate Rodney Reed's execution has been delayed. Texas' Court of Criminal Appeals issued a stay on the execution Friday, only hours following a recommendation from the state's parole board that Gov. Greg Abbott delays the execution for 120 days. Reed was convicted of killing a 19-year-old woman in 1996, but his lawyers say new evidence has come to light that will prove his innocence. Reed's execution had been scheduled for November 20.

    In Mnar Muhawesh's recent MintPress News article, entitled “Social Media Censorship Reaches New Heights as Twitter Permanently Bans Dissent,” he writes: "It’s an open secret. The deep state is working hand in hand with Silicon Valley social media giants like Twitter, Facebook and Google to control the flow of information. That includes suppressing, censoring and sometimes outright purging dissenting voices – all under the guise of fighting fake news and Russian propaganda." What's going on here?

    GUESTS:

    K.J. Noh — Peace activist and scholar on the geopolitics of the Asian continent who writes for CounterPunch and Dissident Voice. He is a special correspondent for KPFA Flashpoints on the “Pivot to Asia,” the Koreas and the Pacific.    

    Nino Pagliccia — Activist and freelance writer based in Vancouver. A retired researcher from the University of British Columbia, Canada, Pagliccia is a Venezuelan-Canadian who follows and writes about international relations with a focus on the Americas, and is also the editor of the book “Cuba Solidarity in Canada – Five Decades of People-to-People Foreign Relations.”    

    Barbara Arnwine — President and founder of the Transformative Justice Coalition and internationally renowned for her contributions on critical justice issues, including the passage of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1991 and the 2006 reauthorization of provisions of the Voting Rights Act.  

    Mark Sleboda — International affairs and security analyst.  

    We'd love to get your feedback at radio@sputniknews.com

    Tags:
    Death Row, Texas, Mint Press, Bolivia, Hong Kong, criminal justice, Twitter
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