11:42 GMT +321 November 2019
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    The Critical Hour

    Democrats Face Off in First Debate: Who's The Best Matchup Against Trump In 2020?

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    On this episode of The Critical Hour, Dr. Wilmer Leon is joined by Bob Schlehuber, Sputnik news analyst; and Wayne Messam, American businessman and politician who has served as the mayor of Miramar, Florida, since 2015.

    The Democratic US presidential candidates hold their first debate Wednesday night in Miami. Ten of the candidates will take the stage this round, and 10 will be on the stage Thursday night. The debate will start at 9 p.m. Eastern Time and end at 11 p.m. The 10 candidates in this debate will have 60 seconds to answer questions and 30 seconds for rebuttals. There will be no opening statements, and each candidate will give a one-minute closing statement. The debate will be broken up into five segments with four commercial breaks. Will any new ground be broken over these two days? Will substantive policy ideas be presented?

    US President Donald Trump seems to be responding to news that former special counsel Robert Mueller will testify next month. On Tuesday, Trump tweeted simply, "Presidential Harassment!" Mueller is set to testify in public sessions of the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees on July 17. Is this just taking us further down the rabbit hole, or will substantive information come from this testimony?

    Hundreds of Wayfair workers are walking off the job today to protest the company's decision to continue doing business with contractors operating migrant detention centers. Organizers with the group Wayfair Walkout are demanding the Boston-based furniture giant stop selling supplies to government facilities housing migrant children. In a letter, more than 500 employees called on the company's leadership to take a stand against what they called the "reprehensible practice of separating families."  

    White House senior adviser Jared Kushner said on Wednesday that the economic issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict were solvable, and he will put out a political plan when the time is right. “By bringing finance ministers and the business community, I was able to bring people who see this the way that I do. Which is it actually is a solvable problem economically ... We thought it was important to bring out the economic vision before the political vision ... because we need people to see what the future can look like,” he told reporters after a conference on the Trump administration’s $50 billion economic plan for Israeli-Palestinian peace. Is this really a dog and pony show with no pony?  

    GUESTS:

    Bob Schlehuber — Producer for By Any Means Necessary and Sputnik news analyst.

    Wayne Messam — American businessman and politician  who has served as the mayor of Miramar, Florida, since 2015.   

    Miko Peled — Israeli-American activist and author of "The General's Son: Journey of an Israeli in Palestine."  

    Abel Nunez — Executive director of the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN).  

    David Schultz — Professor of political science at Hamline University and author of "Presidential Swing States: Why Only Ten Matter." 

    Rodrigue Tremblay — Canadian economist, humanist and political figure. He is a professor emeritus of economics at the Université de Montréal. He specializes in macroeconomics, international trade, finance, and public finance. He is the author of several books on economics and politics.  

    We'd love to get your feedback at radio@sputniknews.com

    Tags:
    Robert Mueller, Jared Kushner, Palestine, Israel, Democratic Debate
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