08:44 GMT30 October 2020
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    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    • Radioactive Excursion: Tourists Explore Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
    © Sputnik / Stringer
    Tourists at the Duga over-the-horizon radar system in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Ukraine.

    In 1986, an explosion at one of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant's reactors disgorged an enormous mass of contaminated nuclear particles into the air. The radioactive cloud stretched out across parts of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia.

    Every day, several hundred tourists visit the abandoned Ukrainian city of Pripyat and Chernobyl, where shift workers serving the station live. Every person is given an individual dosimeter and taught to use it during the tour.

    For several years, the tourists who came to the area were only allowed to visit the abandoned schoolyards, amusement parks, and classrooms outside the nuclear plant. Since 2019, the infamous Reactor 4, where the explosion happened and the reactor's control room, where decisions were made that ultimately contributed to the disaster, have been included in the list of tourist attractions.

    The explosion at the Chernobyl NPP in the early hours of 26 April 1986, and the resulting fallout remain humanity’s closest brush with the dangers of nuclear power.

    Nearly 600,000 people were involved in liquidating the consequences and nearly 2 million were forced to relocate as a result. Nearly 3,000 square miles of territory in northern Ukraine and parts of Belarus have been depopulated, with 1,000 square miles considered off-limits as an exclusion zone due to elevated levels of radiation.

    Tags:
    radioactive, Chernobyl nuclear disaster, Chernobyl
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