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    Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures as he speaks during a press conference on the third and final day of the G-7 summit in Biarritz, France Monday, Aug. 26, 2019

    Boris Johnson's Authority Undermined by Supreme Court Decision - Historian

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    Earlier on Tuesday, the UK's Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Johnson's decision to prorogue parliament was unlawful. Mr Johnson reacted to the news by saying that he respected the ruling but disagreed with it.

    Dr Martin Farr, Senior Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary British History at Newcastle University, reflects on what awaits Boris Johnson now after the court has ruled against his move to prorogue parliament.

    The UK’s Supreme Court has ruled earlier that Johnson's decision to suspend parliament was unlawful. In your view, how could this impact the Brexit process going forward, as we’re getting closer to the 31st of October?

    The decision isn't directly related to Brexit. It's related to parliament's ability to scrutinize the executive and the prime minister. But the occasion for this post-Brexit uncertainty is the consequence of the decision - has been very much to the agreement. The support of people, who wish to have a second referendum or who wish to revoke Article 50 and thereby prevent Brexit - so the remain side, the anti Brexiteers - are much happy with this decision than the Leave side which Prime Minister is representing.

    A cyclist rides past an electronic billboard displaying a British government Brexit information awareness campaign advertisement in London, Britain, September 11, 2019
    © REUTERS / TOBY MELVILLE
    A cyclist rides past an electronic billboard displaying a British government Brexit information awareness campaign advertisement in London, Britain, September 11, 2019

    How will parliament react to future Brexit talks regarding a deal?

    The impacts of this on the Brexit agreement are to simultaneously be much greater pressure on the Prime Minister to find an agreement and get back to Parliament before October 16th. I think it is which is part of the ban bill which was passed a couple of weeks ago - another example of parliament playing its role. On the other hand, his [Boris Johnson’s] authority has been so undermined by this decision. It's hard to imagine that he would be able to negotiate in that way. In fact, it's worth making the point that in almost any previous era - prime minister resigned when faced with a decision like this. This has never happened before, but a decision like this would have brought about the resignation of the prime minister.

    In what position is Boris Johnson now, and how successful do you think he'll be in resolving the Brexit deadlock?

    It’s all going to Boris Johnson’s resignation. It's very hard to see how he can survive, except that there's no way of removing him unless the House of Commons. His authority is absolutely shredded by this decision – the result of many humiliating decisions and failures on his part. It's really been an extraordinarily unfortunate premiership already. It's that big an event and it was very hard to see how political authority can survive from this. 

    The views and opinions expressed in the article do not necessarily reflect those of Sputnik.

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    Brexit, UK Supreme Court, Boris Johnson, United Kingdom
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