Brightest in Decades NEOWISE Comet Flying High in the Skies

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C / 2020 F3 also known as NEOWISE, a comet discovered on 27 March with the use of NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) reached and survived its closest approach to the Sun on 3 July and until recently had been getting even brighter as it moved closer to the Earth.

An ordinary bystander would be able to see the comet, which is the brightest since Hale-Bopp made its appearance in 1997, with their naked eyes from very dark Northern Hemisphere locations during a short window of time this week.

In the morning, the comet appears low above the north-eastern horizon, below Capella. In the evening, the comet can be seen low in the north-western sky.

© AP Photo / Charlie RiedelThe comet Neowise is seen from near Effingham, Kan., Monday, July 13, 2020.
The comet Neowise is seen from near Effingham, Kan., Monday, July 13, 2020 - Sputnik International
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The comet Neowise is seen from near Effingham, Kan., Monday, July 13, 2020.
© AP Photo / Peter KomkaThe Comet NEOWISE or C/2020 F3 is seen above Salgotarjan, Hungary, early Friday, July 10, 2020. It passed closest to the Sun on July 3 and its closest approach to the Earth will occur on July 23.
The Comet NEOWISE or C/2020 F3 is seen above Salgotarjan, Hungary, early Friday, July 10, 2020 - Sputnik International
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The Comet NEOWISE or C/2020 F3 is seen above Salgotarjan, Hungary, early Friday, July 10, 2020. It passed closest to the Sun on July 3 and its closest approach to the Earth will occur on July 23.
© AP Photo / Sergei GritsThe comet Neowise or C/2020 F3 is seen behind an Orthodox church over the Turrets, Belarus, 110 kilometres (69 miles) west of capital Minsk, early Tuesday, July 14, 2020.
The comet Neowise or C/2020 F3 is seen behind an Orthodox church over the Turrets, Belarus, 110 kilometres (69 miles) west of capital Minsk, early Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - Sputnik International
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The comet Neowise or C/2020 F3 is seen behind an Orthodox church over the Turrets, Belarus, 110 kilometres (69 miles) west of capital Minsk, early Tuesday, July 14, 2020.
© REUTERS / Social MediaA person is looking at the Comet C/2020 or "Neowise", which is seen in the sky over Ballintoy, Britain July 8, 2020, in this picture taken from a social media. Picture taken July 8, 2020.
A person is looking at the Comet C/2020 or Neowise, which is seen in the sky over Ballintoy, Britain July 8, 2020, in this picture taken from a social media. Picture taken July 8, 2020 - Sputnik International
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A person is looking at the Comet C/2020 or "Neowise", which is seen in the sky over Ballintoy, Britain July 8, 2020, in this picture taken from a social media. Picture taken July 8, 2020.
© REUTERS / Firmin BoyonThe Comet C/2020 F3, known as "Neowise", is seen in the sky over Montlucon, France July 8, 2020, in this screengrab taken from a social media video. Picture taken July 8, 2020.
The Comet C/2020 F3, known as Neowise, is seen in the sky over Montlucon, France July 8, 2020, in this screengrab taken from a social media video - Sputnik International
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The Comet C/2020 F3, known as "Neowise", is seen in the sky over Montlucon, France July 8, 2020, in this screengrab taken from a social media video. Picture taken July 8, 2020.
© AFP 2022 / Karl-Josef HildenbrandThe comet Neowise or C/2020 F3 is seen before sunrise in the starry sky over the Allgau landscape in Bad Woerishofen, southern Germany, on July 12, 2020. The comet was discovered by NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or NEOWISE, on March 27, 2020. Since then, the comet — called comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE and nicknamed comet NEOWISE — has been spotted by several NASA spacecraft, including Parker Solar Probe, NASA’s Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and astronauts aboard the International Space Station.
The comet Neowise or C/2020 F3 is seen before sunrise in the starry sky over the Allgau landscape in Bad Woerishofen, southern Germany, on July 12, 2020 - Sputnik International
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The comet Neowise or C/2020 F3 is seen before sunrise in the starry sky over the Allgau landscape in Bad Woerishofen, southern Germany, on July 12, 2020. The comet was discovered by NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or NEOWISE, on March 27, 2020. Since then, the comet — called comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE and nicknamed comet NEOWISE — has been spotted by several NASA spacecraft, including Parker Solar Probe, NASA’s Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and astronauts aboard the International Space Station.
© REUTERS / Nayoro Observatory The Comet "Neowise" is seen in the sky over Nayoro, Hokkaido, Japan July 11, 2020, in this still image taken from a video.
The Comet Neowise is seen in the sky over Nayoro, Hokkaido, Japan July 11, 2020, in this still image taken from a video - Sputnik International
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The Comet "Neowise" is seen in the sky over Nayoro, Hokkaido, Japan July 11, 2020, in this still image taken from a video.
© REUTERS / Guglielmo MangiapaneThe Comet C/2020 or "Neowise" is seen in the sky behind the dome of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, Italy, July 13, 2020. Picture taken July 13, 2020.
The Comet C/2020 or Neowise is seen in the sky behind the dome of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, Italy, July 13, 2020 - Sputnik International
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The Comet C/2020 or "Neowise" is seen in the sky behind the dome of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, Italy, July 13, 2020. Picture taken July 13, 2020.
© REUTERS / Jon NazcaThe Comet C/2020 or "Neowise" is seen in the sky from the "Puerto del Viento" mountain pass (1190 metres/3904 feet altitude) at dawn in Ronda, southern Spain, July 15, 2020.
The Comet C/2020 or Neowise is seen in the sky from the Puerto del Viento mountain pass (1190 metres/3904 feet altitude) at dawn in Ronda, southern Spain, July 15, 2020 - Sputnik International
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The Comet C/2020 or "Neowise" is seen in the sky from the "Puerto del Viento" mountain pass (1190 metres/3904 feet altitude) at dawn in Ronda, southern Spain, July 15, 2020.
© Photo : Instagram account of Ivan VagnerDuring the next revolution, I tried to capture the C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) comet a bit closer, the brightest one over the last 7 years. Its tail is quite clearly visible from the ISS.
During the next revolution, I tried to capture the C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) comet a bit closer, the brightest one over the last 7 years - Sputnik International
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During the next revolution, I tried to capture the C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) comet a bit closer, the brightest one over the last 7 years. Its tail is quite clearly visible from the ISS.
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