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From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World

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Great works of art have become famous for a reason, as they are captivating in a way that is both immediate and timeless. However, they also inspire emotionally disturbed or unhinged individuals to vandalise the work.

Two Ukrainian tourists have scratched their names on a fresco by one of the greatest geniuses of the Renaissance, Raphael Santi. The incident has since caused outrage on social media, with demands that a probe into this shocking act of vandalism be carried out.

Italian Renaissance painter and architect Raphael painted in 1508-1517 with his apprentices the Stanza della Segnatura ("Room of the Signatura") frescoes located in the Vatican.

A new work by Banksy appeared on the wall of a building in Bristol on the eve of Valentine's Day. The picture shows a young girl aiming from a slingshot at the sky, and a red explosion painted on the wall on the top right. The work lasted only 48 hours before the inscription "BCC W *** ERS" appeared on it.

CC BY-SA 3.0 / 0ro1 / Two Ukrainian tourists scratched their names on a fresco by one of the greatest geniuses of the Renaissance, Raphael Santi. 
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
1/21
Two Ukrainian tourists scratched their names on a fresco by one of the greatest geniuses of the Renaissance, Raphael Santi. 
© © Screenshot: Facebook / Italy for usTwo Ukrainian tourists scratched "Lena and Tamara from Vinnytsia" on a fresco by one of the greatest geniuses of the Renaissance, Raphael Santi. 
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
2/21
Two Ukrainian tourists scratched "Lena and Tamara from Vinnytsia" on a fresco by one of the greatest geniuses of the Renaissance, Raphael Santi. 
© Depositphotos / SergeyVidyulinGlass Bay, a beach on Ussuri Bay located in the Primorsky Region. Chinese tourists steal glass stones for souvenirs.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
3/21
Glass Bay, a beach on Ussuri Bay located in the Primorsky Region. Chinese tourists steal glass stones for souvenirs.
© Depositphotos / Irinabal18Glass Bay, a beach on Ussuri Bay located in the Primorsky Region. Chinese tourists steal glass stones for souvenirs.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
4/21
Glass Bay, a beach on Ussuri Bay located in the Primorsky Region. Chinese tourists steal glass stones for souvenirs.
© AFP 2021 / Andreas SolaroThe outside of the papal basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore (Saint Mary Major) after a vandal attacked the bronze and wooden door with stone and damaged the portrayal of the Annunciation to the Virgin Mary (door on R) on 19 December 2011 in Rome.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
5/21
The outside of the papal basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore (Saint Mary Major) after a vandal attacked the bronze and wooden door with stone and damaged the portrayal of the Annunciation to the Virgin Mary (door on R) on 19 December 2011 in Rome.
© AFP 2021 / Andreas SolaroPeople stand by the entrance to the papal basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore (Saint Mary Major) after a vandal attacked the bronze and wooden door with stone and damaged the portrayal of the Annunciation to the Virgin Mary (L) on 19 December 2011 in Rome.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
6/21
People stand by the entrance to the papal basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore (Saint Mary Major) after a vandal attacked the bronze and wooden door with stone and damaged the portrayal of the Annunciation to the Virgin Mary (L) on 19 December 2011 in Rome.
© AP PhotoThe famous Little Mermaid statue covered in paint in Copenhagen Harbour in Churchill Park, Denmark, June 1970. The sculptor Edward Eriksen created the statue, which was unveiled on 23 August 1913.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
7/21
The famous Little Mermaid statue covered in paint in Copenhagen Harbour in Churchill Park, Denmark, June 1970. The sculptor Edward Eriksen created the statue, which was unveiled on 23 August 1913.
© Photo : Policia NacionalA 12th-century statue on the facade of the Santiago de Compostela Cathedral in Spain, on which Kiss fans painted a cat's whiskers.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
8/21
A 12th-century statue on the facade of the Santiago de Compostela Cathedral in Spain, on which Kiss fans painted a cat's whiskers.
© AFP 2021 / Pascal PavaniThe Cathedral Basilica of Saint Cecilia, also known as Albi Cathedral, is the most important Catholic building in Albi, France completed in the 15th century. Unknown people have left inscriptions and scratches on the walls of the cathedral.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
9/21
The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Cecilia, also known as Albi Cathedral, is the most important Catholic building in Albi, France completed in the 15th century. Unknown people have left inscriptions and scratches on the walls of the cathedral.
© AP Photo / Pier Paolo CitoItalian Carabineri, paramilitary policemen, inspect a damaged bust during an anti-vandalism patrol at Pincio Park in downtown Rome. The Vandals famously sacked Rome in 455, plundering the city for two weeks, wreaking havoc and looting artistic treasures. More than 1,500 years later, they are still at it. They scrawl graffiti on the walls of historic buildings, hammer statues in Rome's beloved parks, and throw dye into the Trevi Fountain. Faced with a recent spat of vandalism, culture officials are trying to prevent the damage as they grapple to restore the defaced art. But what makes protecting the Italian capital especially challenging is the sheer amount of its treasures.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
10/21
Italian Carabineri, paramilitary policemen, inspect a damaged bust during an anti-vandalism patrol at Pincio Park in downtown Rome. The Vandals famously sacked Rome in 455, plundering the city for two weeks, wreaking havoc and looting artistic treasures. More than 1,500 years later, they are still at it. They scrawl graffiti on the walls of historic buildings, hammer statues in Rome's beloved parks, and throw dye into the Trevi Fountain. Faced with a recent spat of vandalism, culture officials are trying to prevent the damage as they grapple to restore the defaced art. But what makes protecting the Italian capital especially challenging is the sheer amount of its treasures.
© AFP 2021 / HO / Peruvian National PoliceA policeman showing a rock dislodged by a group of foreign tourists when trespassing on the ancient Inca citadel of Machu Picchu, Peru, on 12 January 2020. Peruvian police arrested and interrogated six foreign tourists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and France for entering prohibited areas and causing damage to cultural property.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
11/21
A policeman showing a rock dislodged by a group of foreign tourists when trespassing on the ancient Inca citadel of Machu Picchu, Peru, on 12 January 2020. Peruvian police arrested and interrogated six foreign tourists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and France for entering prohibited areas and causing damage to cultural property.
© AFP 2021 / Taha JawashiTourists visit a cave bearing pre-historic drawings in Wadi Tin Lalin, in Libya's Akakus mountain region, in the desert of the western Ghat District on 1 January 2016. Rock artwork in the Akakus mountain range has been threatened for many years by vandals spraying graffiti and carving on the ancient drawings or splashing water to bring out the colours for better photos.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
12/21
Tourists visit a cave bearing pre-historic drawings in Wadi Tin Lalin, in Libya's Akakus mountain region, in the desert of the western Ghat District on 1 January 2016. Rock artwork in the Akakus mountain range has been threatened for many years by vandals spraying graffiti and carving on the ancient drawings or splashing water to bring out the colours for better photos.
© AFP 2021 / Taha JawashiA local guide shows graffiti on a pre-historic drawing in a cave in Wadi Tin Lalin, in Libya's Akakus mountain region, in the desert of the western Ghat District, on 1 January 2016. Rock artwork in the Akakus mountain range has been threatened for many years by vandals spraying graffiti and carving on the ancient drawings or splashing water to bring out the colours for better photos.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
13/21
A local guide shows graffiti on a pre-historic drawing in a cave in Wadi Tin Lalin, in Libya's Akakus mountain region, in the desert of the western Ghat District, on 1 January 2016. Rock artwork in the Akakus mountain range has been threatened for many years by vandals spraying graffiti and carving on the ancient drawings or splashing water to bring out the colours for better photos.
© AFP 2021 / StringerThe fountain of Ain El Fouara in Setif, some 300 kilometres east of the Algerian capital Algiers after it was vandalised on 18 December 2017. According to the police, a man with mental disabilities vandalised the fountain made by French sculptor Francis de Saint-Vidal in 1899.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
14/21
The fountain of Ain El Fouara in Setif, some 300 kilometres east of the Algerian capital Algiers after it was vandalised on 18 December 2017. According to the police, a man with mental disabilities vandalised the fountain made by French sculptor Francis de Saint-Vidal in 1899.
© AFP 2021 / STRThe damaged hand of Neptune, a famous Renaissance statue in Florence on 03 August 2005. A man, in the early hours, climbed up the white marble Neptune and broke his hand in Florence's central Piazza della Signoria. Local police arrested two brothers who were thought to be drunk when they climbed onto the statue.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
15/21
The damaged hand of Neptune, a famous Renaissance statue in Florence on 03 August 2005. A man, in the early hours, climbed up the white marble Neptune and broke his hand in Florence's central Piazza della Signoria. Local police arrested two brothers who were thought to be drunk when they climbed onto the statue.
© AP Photo / STRThe damaged hand of Neptune, a famous Renaissance statue in Florence on 03 August 2005. A man, in the early hours, climbed up the white marble Neptune and broke his hand in Florence's central Piazza della Signoria. Local police arrested two brothers who were thought to be drunk when they climbed onto the statue.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
16/21
The damaged hand of Neptune, a famous Renaissance statue in Florence on 03 August 2005. A man, in the early hours, climbed up the white marble Neptune and broke his hand in Florence's central Piazza della Signoria. Local police arrested two brothers who were thought to be drunk when they climbed onto the statue.
© Sputnik / Alexei Danichev / Go to the photo bankSt. Petersburg's Bank Bridge is one of the world's most beautiful pedestrian bridges, thanks to the glorious sculptures of golden-winged Griffins by famous local sculptor Pavel Sokolov. Vandals have scraped off all the gilding from the wings of the recently restored Griffins on Bank Bridge.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
17/21
St. Petersburg's Bank Bridge is one of the world's most beautiful pedestrian bridges, thanks to the glorious sculptures of golden-winged Griffins by famous local sculptor Pavel Sokolov. Vandals have scraped off all the gilding from the wings of the recently restored Griffins on Bank Bridge.
© Sputnik / Alexei Danichev / Go to the photo bankSt. Petersburg's Bank Bridge is one of the world's most beautiful pedestrian bridges, thanks to the glorious sculptures of golden-winged Griffins by famous local sculptor Pavel Sokolov. Vandals have scraped off all the gilding from the wings of the recently restored Griffins on Bank Bridge.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
18/21
St. Petersburg's Bank Bridge is one of the world's most beautiful pedestrian bridges, thanks to the glorious sculptures of golden-winged Griffins by famous local sculptor Pavel Sokolov. Vandals have scraped off all the gilding from the wings of the recently restored Griffins on Bank Bridge.
© AP Photo / Ben Birchall/PAPeople take photos of a mural by Bansky on the side of a house on Marsh Lane, in Barton Hill, Bristol, England, Saturday, 15 February 2020. It was vandalised just days after being put up. The artwork was confirmed as being by the artist Bansky on Valentine's Day.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
19/21
People take photos of a mural by Bansky on the side of a house on Marsh Lane, in Barton Hill, Bristol, England, Saturday, 15 February 2020. It was vandalised just days after being put up. The artwork was confirmed as being by the artist Bansky on Valentine's Day.
© AP Photo / Ben Birchall/PAA view of a mural by Bansky on the side of a house on Marsh Lane, in Barton Hill, Bristol, England, Saturday, 15 February 2020. It was vandalised just days after being put up. The artwork was confirmed as being by the artist Bansky on Valentine's Day.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
20/21
A view of a mural by Bansky on the side of a house on Marsh Lane, in Barton Hill, Bristol, England, Saturday, 15 February 2020. It was vandalised just days after being put up. The artwork was confirmed as being by the artist Bansky on Valentine's Day.
© AFP 2021 / Centro de estudios BorjanosA combination of three documents provided by the Centre de Estudios Borjanos on 22 August 2012 shows the original version of the painting Ecce Homo (L) by 19th-century painter Elias Garcia Martinez, the deteriorated version (C) and the restored version by an elderly woman in Spain. An elderly woman's catastrophic attempt to "restore" a century-old oil painting of Christ in a Spanish church provoked popular uproar and amusement. Titled "Ecce Homo" (Behold the Man), the original was no masterpiece, painted in two hours in 1910 by a certain Elias Garcia Martinez directly on a column in the church in Borja, northeastern Spain. The well-intentioned but ham-fisted amateur artist, in her 80s, took it upon herself to fill in the patches and paint over the original work, which depicted Christ crowned with thorns, his sorrowful gaze lifted to heaven.
From Raphael to Banksy: How Vandals Ruin Artwork All Over the World - Sputnik International
21/21
A combination of three documents provided by the Centre de Estudios Borjanos on 22 August 2012 shows the original version of the painting Ecce Homo (L) by 19th-century painter Elias Garcia Martinez, the deteriorated version (C) and the restored version by an elderly woman in Spain. An elderly woman's catastrophic attempt to "restore" a century-old oil painting of Christ in a Spanish church provoked popular uproar and amusement. Titled "Ecce Homo" (Behold the Man), the original was no masterpiece, painted in two hours in 1910 by a certain Elias Garcia Martinez directly on a column in the church in Borja, northeastern Spain. The well-intentioned but ham-fisted amateur artist, in her 80s, took it upon herself to fill in the patches and paint over the original work, which depicted Christ crowned with thorns, his sorrowful gaze lifted to heaven.
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