22:11 GMT +317 January 2020
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    The now infamous Carlos Ghosn, arrested and charged with financial improprieties, reportedly had to hide in a bass case on his trip to Turkey, from where he then flew to Lebanon, escaping what he described as a "rigged Japanese justice system".

    Former CEO of the Nissan Motor Company, carmaker Renault SA and Mitsubishi Motors, Carlos Ghosn has been "sneaked" out of Japan in an Audio Gear box by two US nationals, Fox Business News reported on Monday.

    According to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), the once notorious car tycoon was reportedly transported to Istanbul in a private jet in late December and then flew to Beirut, where he had grown up after moving there at age six. Before hiding in the case, he had managed to escape from Tokyo to Osaka International Airport in a bullet train.

    The picture of the supposed musical instrument box has been obtained by the WSJ and shared on social media. Reports say the case was a "leftover" from a Christmas band's performance at Ghosn's home in Tokyo. The breathing holes drilled in the case can be seen in the photo.

    According to the Asahi newspaper, on 29 December, Ghosn left his house in Tokyo that was supposed to be under 24-hour surveillance with no difficulty.

    It was also reported earlier that Ghosn had three passports, including a French and a Lebanese one.

    In November 2018, Ghosn, now 65, was arrested in Tokyo over allegations of dramatically under-reporting his earnings while at the helm of Nissan and misusing company assets.

    Ghosn denied any wrongdoing and claimed that executives at Nissan were behind his legal woes because they feared he been planning a full-on merger with France's Renault, which he had also chaired in the past.

    Interpol has issued a "red notice" for Carlos Ghosn, urging police forces around the world to arrest him.

    Ghosn himself has promised to speak to reporters on Wednesday.

    Tags:
    reports, United States, security, Carlos Ghosn, corruption charges, private jet, Turkey, Lebanon, Japan
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