03:48 GMT +318 November 2019
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    In this file photo taken on January 23, 2019 an anti-Brexit activist waves a Union and a European Union flag as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in central London

    UK is Officially a Laughing Stock: Remainers and Leavers Have Fun on Social Media on #BrexitDay

    © AFP 2019 / DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS
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    Thursday - 31 October - marks the second time Britain has failed to exit the European Union as promised by successive Conservative Prime Ministers. But Remainers and Leavers have both largely seen the funny side of it on social media.

    Thousands of people are using the hashtag #BrexitDay on Twitter as 31 October was the date on which Britain was supposed to be leaving the European Union.

    When he came into office in July, Boris Johnson promised to take Britain out “with or without a deal” and said he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than ask for an extension to Article 50.

    ​But in the end Johnson failed to get his deal passed Parliament after the Democratic Unionist Party rebelled because of how it affected Northern Ireland’s place within the union and he was forced to seek an extension until January 31.

    ​Remainers cracked jokes on Twitter and mocked the Prime Minister while Brexiteers’ tweets had a more bitter and angry feel to them.

    ​It is not the first Brexit withdrawal deadline the government has missed.

    ​Originally Theresa May set March 29 as the Brexit deadline but she failed to get her deal passed and was forced to ask for a six month extension.

    ​Earlier this week Johnson finally got Parliament to agree to a General Election on 12 December after Labour said it accepted a no deal Brexit had been taken off the table.

    ​In June 2016 the majority of British voters - 52 percent - opted for Brexit in a referendum which led to the resignation of the then Prime Minister David Cameron.

     

    Tags:
    European Union, Article 50, Boris Johnson, Brexit
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