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    German tech entrepreneur Kim Dotcom sits in a chair during a court hearing in Auckland, New Zealand, September 24, 2015

    Kim Dotcom’s Last Ditch Effort to Avoid Extradition to the US

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    Megaupload’s founder was charged for illegal distribution of copyright protected content and arrested back in 2012, but the extradition process from New Zealand took longer than expected.

    When Kim was founding his Megaupload website, one of the first cloud-like web services, which later netted him huge profits, he probably never expected it would put him at risk of being imprisoned for up to 20 years. Now his 6-year battle against extradition from New Zealand to the US, where he will face the actual charges, comes to an end as this week he and the three other co-defendants will face the Wellington Court of Appeal, which will decide whether they are eligible for extradition.

    It all started back in 2012 when police raided his Auckland mansion at the request of the FBI, which also shut down his Megaupload website. In the US he will face charges of criminal copyright infringement, money laundering and conspiracy to commit racketeering, but first the bureau had to get him on American soil, which has proved to be quite difficult.

    READ MORE: Denied: US Government Says Kim Dotcom Can’t Recover $42M in Seized Assets

    Dotcom himself claims that the FBI chose him as their scapegoat only because he was an “easy target” and fitted the profile of “a villain who's rich, flamboyant and over-the-top.” He marked the sixth anniversary of the raid by announcing a multi-billion dollar suit against the New Zealand government for the damages caused to him and his property.

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    Tags:
    piracy, Extradition, appeal, court, Megaupload, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Kim Dotcom, New Zealand
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