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    Mumbai attacks: one year on

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    One year has passed since more than 10 coordinated terror attacks hit the Indian city of Mumbai in 59 hours, claiming at least 166 lives and wounding more than 300 people.

    One year has passed since more than 10 coordinated terror attacks hit the Indian city of Mumbai in 59 hours, claiming at least 166 lives and wounding more than 300 people.

    On the first anniversary of the event, the nation paid its respects to the victims of the three-day rampage. Memorials were organized at the locations where the attacks took place. Indian police also paraded through the city to display their new weapons and armored vehicles.

    On November 26, 2008, at around 21:30 local time, two men entered the passenger hall of the Chhatrapati Shivaji railway station and opened fire with Kalashnikov assault riffles. Fifty-two people died and over 100 were injured in the attack, which lasted for more than an hour.

    Later, overnight, terrorists attacked a popular restaurant in south Mumbai, killing at least 10 people and injuring many more.

    Gunmen also seized two luxury hotels in the city center, taking some 40 hostages. Fierce battles between the terrorists and Indian security forces lasted for several days. Dozens of guests and staff at the two hotels were killed.

    An attack on the Chabad Lubavitch Jewish center claimed the lives of at least six people, including a pregnant woman.

    India then blamed the Pakistani-based Lashkar-e-Taiba movement for the assault and said it wanted to see a "visible response" from Islamabad.

    Mohammed Ajmal Amir Kasab is the only one of the 10 terrorists who was captured alive. His trial began in May in the heavily fortified Arthur Road jail complex in central Mumbai and is still underway, although he has pleaded guilty. A total of 12 charges have been filed against the baby-faced killer, including murder and waging war against India. He faces death by hanging, but investigators are still trying to persuade him to give up the organizers of the attacks.

    On Wednesday, seven men were charged in Pakistan with planning and helping to carry out the attacks. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh welcomed the charges and said Pakistani authorities must do their best to punish those responsible.

    Following the attacks, security has been strengthened in Mumbai. Ashok, a 48-year-old police officer, who patrols the Mumbai Central railway station, said Mumbai police received new weapons in place of their outdated carbines and rifles.

    Mumbai police joint commissioner Rakesh Maria, who is supervising the investigation into the attacks, said the public should help the police prevent possible terrorist attacks.

    "Look at the train station - it is overcrowded: 6.5 million passengers use electric trains every day," he said. "We count on people. They should become the police's eyes and ears."

    MUMBAI, November 26 (RIA Novosti)

     

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