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    The speaker of Russia's lower house of parliament refused to rule out new sanctions against Georgia Wednesday, and said amendments affecting postal and banking operations will be made to the national security law.

    MOSCOW, October 4 (RIA Novosti) - The speaker of Russia's lower house of parliament refused to rule out new sanctions against Georgia Wednesday, and said amendments affecting postal and banking operations will be made to the national security law.

    Russia suspended postal and travel links with Georgia Monday after four Russian officers were charged in Tbilisi with espionage. They were later released but the row between the two countries continues.

    Speaker Boris Gryzlov told journalists Wednesday: "Not all sanctions have been imposed."

    He added that as the actions of Georgian authorities could be viewed as state terrorism, Russian anti-terrorism legislation could be used against Georgia. He also said amendments on postal and banking operations had to be made to the national security law.

    "We agreed that amendments will be made to the national security law, which will give the president the right to introduce restrictions on countries and territories that present a threat to Russia's national security," Gryzlov said after a meeting with leaders of Duma factions.

    He said he hoped the amendments will be considered on a first reading by the parliament as soon as possible.

    On Monday, Gryzlov told journalists that two committees in the State Duma were ordered to prepare the amendments, which will give the government the right to introduce in extreme cases restrictions on banking operations with regard to countries or regions.

    Gryzlov said MPs also consider it a provocation that about 300,000 illegal Georgian immigrants work and earn money in Russia.

    "According to last year's data, $350 million was taken [by Georgian immigrants] from Russia officially, but according to unofficial data the sum totals about $1 billion," Gryzlov said.

    This past spring, Moscow imposed a ban on Georgian wine and mineral water imports saying they fall short of Russian food safety regulations. But Tbilisi said the blockade was a reaction to its pro-Western policies and its plans to integrate with the European Union and NATO.

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