27 August 2013, 12:32

US hand in Saddam’s 1980s gas attacks undermines case against Syria

President Barack Obama listens as Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, briefs him on the terror threat, in the Map Room of the White House, Aug. 6, 2013. Also participating in the briefing are National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice and Chief of Staff Denis McDonough.

President Barack Obama listens as Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, briefs him on the terror threat, in the Map Room of the White House, Aug. 6, 2013. Also participating in the briefing are National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice and Chief of Staff Denis McDonough.

President Barack Obama listens as Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, briefs him on the terror threat, in the Map Room of the White House, Aug. 6, 2013. Also participating in the briefing are National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice and Chief of Staff Denis McDonough.

by Ric Young

WASHINGTON (VOR)— Just as U.S. and Western leaders and media are converging around condemnation of Syria for its alleged use of chemical weapons against opposition forces in its civil war, evidence has resurfaced that the U.S. condoned and even coached Saddam Hussein’s use of chemical weapons against Iran during the Iraq-Iran war in the late 1980s.

For an assessment of how these revelations apply to the developing crisis in Syria, VOR's Ric Young turned to VOR Moscow commentator and correspondent Dmitry Babich.

As Babich points out, given that the prospect of Western military intervention in Syria depends in large part on the assumption of chemical weapon attacks, the history of surreptitious support for Saddam Hussein’s gas attacks should spur reconsideration of the current rush to war.

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