31 March 2011, 13:30

Quake-hit Japan adopts Russian know-how

Quake-hit Japan adopts Russian know-how

The fate of over 16,000 Japanese people remains unknown following a destructive earthquake and subsequent tsunami which hit the country on March 11th, according to figures revealed by the police. The search for those missing requires the most cutting-edge rescue equipment, including various devices developed and manufactured in Russia.

The fate of over 16,000 Japanese people remains unknown following a destructive earthquake and subsequent tsunami which hit the country on March 11th, according to figures revealed by the police. The search for those missing requires the most cutting-edge rescue equipment, including various devices developed and manufactured in Russia.

Breathe deeper if you are trapped beneath debris - such advice is offered by Russian scientist Gairat Ikramov. A few years ago, he invented a radar capable of measuring the pulse of a person located within a 70-meter range, if the person is in the line of sight. However, under rubble this device can only locate people within 5-6 meters.

The radar processes information and shows on the screen whether anyone moving and breathing has been found. If a person can breathe - in other words if his chest is moving - computers display all parameters of his breathing, such as the rate, amplitude and so on, Gairat Ikramov explained.

The Japanese were first to show their keen interest in the newly-designed device, which was initially produced solely for Russia’s domestic purposes. Now it is used in South and North America, Southeastern Asia and some European countries. The radar has saved many lives, Gairat Ikramov argues.

This radio-wave device helped to find a boy who spent 96 hours trapped in a car following a landslide caused by the 2004 Niigata earthquake in Japan. And in 2008, Japanese rescuers equipped with our radars found several people when dealing with the aftermath of the disaster in China’s eastern Sichuan Province. The same thing happened this year in Christchurch, New Zealand, where 30 Japanese were found under the debris, Gairat Ikramov elaborated.

Radio-wave radars prove invaluable in search-and-rescue operations, multiplying chances of saving people from destroyed buildings, hazardous mines and snow avalanches. Thanks to its easy-to-use form, weight and control, the device can be operated effectively by one person. Gairat Ikramov’s invention was even honored with an award from the Russian Emergency Ministry.

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