04:10 GMT30 September 2020
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    The Washington Redskins has a long history, starting from its foundation in 1932, with Forbes reporting them as the fifth most-valuable NFL franchise. A part of the team's history is also involved with controversy over its name, which has been questioned by Native Americans and others since the 1960s.

    FedEx, the company holding the naming rights to the stadium where the National Football League (NFL) Washington Redskins play, on Thursday requested the team change its nickname amid the ongoing anti-racism movement spanning the US, dividing public opinion and causing hot debate on social media. 

    "We have communicated to the team in Washington our request that they change the team name," FedEx said in a statement.

    The $205 million deal with the Redskins dates back to 1998 and runs through 2025. Dan Snyder, the owner of the team, has faced increasing pressure to change the name of the team, which many suggest is racist, and ongoing efforts to change the name have been gaining ground since the 1960s. 

    Netizens, like everyone else, have engaged in outraged dispute over the matter, with many calling to enjoy the sport, and not become offended because of a name. Some recall that FedEx did not seem to have a problem with the team name when they made the original deal at the end of the last century.

    ​Some users cited polls suggesting that a majority of Native Americans do not care about the name.

    ​Another group of users insists that the name is a "slur" and is "racist", supporting the pressure on the team to change it.

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    Tags:
    FedEx, Twitter, anti-racism, Black Lives Matter, NFL
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